Derminator



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Messages - SarahVaughter

511
Dermarolling / Microneedling / Re: Snapping/Crackling Sound
« on: January 16, 2013, 03:26:03 PM »
Our skin is supposed to protect us and therefore it is elastic but still tough. It is not easy to penetrate the skin and the snapping sounds do not mean it is scar tissue. Scar tissue is made of dense collagen bundles so it is tougher than scar-free skin.  You can usually feel a difference in the necessary force to penetrate a scar versus that required to pierce scarless skin but the snapping sounds are normal in both.

512
I recommend a regular 0.5 mm dermaroller (roll your cheeks up to three times a week) and a 1.5 mm dermastamp with 35 needles (stamp the scars every three weeks). Stamp one cheek, when it heals stamp the other.

To keep acne under control and to diminish post acne spots, you can try our Tretinoin cream. Initially, it dries the skin so you have to mositurize.

513
Dermarolling / Microneedling / Re: Needle length for groin area,
« on: January 16, 2013, 03:23:46 PM »
The skin on the groin itself is thin. I am not sure a dermaroller is even maneuverable in that area but you can try a narrow version.

For hyperpigmentation, frequent rolls with a 0.5 mm roller are often successful.

You can also try our Tretinoin cream (it helps with hyperpigmentation) but initially it dries the skin and dry skin appears crepey. You can however mix Tretinoin with oil or apply oil on top of Tretinoin to offset dryness.

514
The needle length depends on how deep in the skin the problem resides. Whether the problem is in the epidermis or in the dermis and how deeply in the dermis.

I will paste here what I wrote in another thread:

The skin consists of the epidermis and the dermis. The epidermis is very thin comparing to the dermis.

Total skin thickness varies depending where on the body it is (the thinnest skin is on the eyelids, approx. 0.5 mm, the thickest is on the foot soles, approx. 4 mm) and it also varies individually but it is on average between 1 - 2 mm thick in total.

The thickness of the epidermis also depends on where on the body it is. The epidermis on the eyelids is about 0.05 mm thick. The epidermis on the foot soles is about 1.5 mm thick. The face has on average about a 0.1 to 0.3 mm thick epidermis.

Thus a 0.25 mm dermaroller will affect and improve the tone, texture and thickness of the epidermis.
A 0.5 mm roller will even reach the top layer of the dermis.



When the skin gets red, it means the desired processes in the skin were trigged:

http://owndoc.com/dermarolling/how-dermarolling-works/

...but it does not necessarily mean you have gone deep enough because the skin gets red even from rolling with a 0.2 mm dermaroller. It only means the needles did penetrate the skin and the rolling was dense enough.

However, any size that reaches the dermis will address the problems in the dermis.

Most scars are usually deep (except for shallow acne scars etc.) and you should stamp them with a 1.5 mm dermastamp. A dermastamp penetrates deeper than a dermarolloller of the same needle length (unless you push the roller into the skin with very much force). A 1.5 mm dermastamp normally penetrates about as deep as a 2 mm dermaroller.

Pigmentation problems and overall skin texture are often improved by frequent rolls with a 0.5 mm dermaroller.

Under the skin there is mainly fat but also larger blood vessels, nerves, connective tissue, lymphatic vessels, sweat glands, hair follicles etc.

We do not sell needles longer than 2 mm.

515
Dermarolling / Microneedling / Re: .25 vs .5 for epidermis
« on: January 16, 2013, 03:19:43 PM »
The skin consists of the epidermis and the dermis. The epidermis is very thin compared to the dermis.

Total skin thickness varies depending where it is on the body (the thinnest skin is on the eyelids, approx. 0.5 mm, the thickest is on the foot soles, approx. 4 mm) and it also varies individually but it is on average 1 - 2 mm thick in total.

The thickness of the epidermis also depends on where on the body it is. The epidermis on the eyelids is about 0.05 mm thick. The epidermis on the foot soles is about 1.5 mm thick. The face has on average about a 0.1 to 0.3 mm thick epidermis.

Thus a 0.25 mm dermaroller will affect and improve the tone, texture and thickness of the epidermis.

A 0.5 mm roller will even reach the top layer of the dermis.

516
Dermarolling / Microneedling / Re: Chicken Pox Scar
« on: January 16, 2013, 03:17:47 PM »
Do you mean Retin A (containing tretinoin = retinoic acid)?

You can apply both peptides and Retin A but not on the same day. Apply them in turns. Applying Retin A three times a week is enough.

518
You do not have to induce blood.

In order to induce collagen you have to reach the dermis part of the skin. A 0.5 mm needle size reaches the top of the dermis so for scars, use at least 1 mm dermastamp or longer.

Please read:

http://owndoc.com/dermarolling/how-dermarolling-works/

Related subject:

http://forums.owndoc.com/dermarolling-microneedling/dr-desmond-fernandes/   

This is a paragraph from our dermarolling instructions concerning enlarged pores:

Enlarged pores

Dermarolling works very effectively on acne scars but pores are not scars. Pores are ducts in the skin and their size is genetically determined. There is currently no method that can reliably and permanently make pores smaller. Very few of our customers managed to make their pores smaller through microneedling. You can try a regular 0.2 mm or a 0.5 dermaroller to thicken the epidermis or a 0.5 mm dermastamp. A thickened epidermis could make pores look smaller because the pore size is the smallest on the skin's surface and as you go deeper into the skin, the pore channel widens. Some of our customers improved their pore size with the single needle but always try just one pore to see if it is not making it worse. Do not expect results too soon.

519
Dermarolling / Microneedling / Re: Single needling upper lip wrinkles
« on: January 16, 2013, 03:15:02 PM »
It is completely normal to have prolonged redness after single needling because it is intense and it goes deep. It is not completely unusual to get blisters and it is common to get scabs (do not remove them, let them fall off naturally).

You have not done too many pricks; doing over 20 pricks is very OK.

If the blisters are cold sores (I do not think so) you can take an OTC antiviral medication (Zovirax etc.) prior to dermaneedling.

To avoid having many red lines for many days, treat only one wrinkle at a time. When it heals, treat the other one.

As we suggest in our size guide, one of the best tool for the wrinkles above the lips is a 1.5 mm dermastamp with 35 needles (single needling is also very effective here but not as easy and more painful).

If you use the dermastamp, it will also be red and it may stay red for days.

From my own experience, the area around the lips is so sensitive that a numbing cream is necessary. I do not need a numbing cream anywhere else.

520
Dermarolling / Microneedling / Re: Best Skin Care Routine
« on: January 14, 2013, 02:28:41 PM »
No it does not cause sensitivity to light, otherwise we would have mentioned that in the store and in our instructions.

521
Liposuction scars can be improved with dermaneedling but in your case, the grooves are probably caused by uneven fat levels. There was slightly more fat removed in some areas than in the others. In liposuction, the fat right under the skin is not removed, the fat in deeper layers is removed but it is not so easy to ideally and precisely distinguish it with the sucking cannula, especially in the areas like under the chin. There are additional problems in that area as I mention at the end of this article:

http://owndoc.com/dermarolling/dermarolling-microneedling-hype-realistic-results/

Dermaneedling cannot level out fat levels or trigger fat production.

Dermaneedling can slightly thicken the skin however not enough to balance missing fat. You can try a 1 mm dermastamp but do not expect any major improvement.

If you have liposuction in the future (anywhere on the body), the surgeon could inject some of the removed fat into the grooves.

522
"If you could hit a few  anatomy/physiology texts, or cosmetic surgeons, to discover what is going on w/ the chin wrinkles, I'd be very much in your debt."

You are asking me to do research for you in the scientific literature or contact surgeons so I can advise you on a skin problem on your chin for which you don't even submit a photo?

I am not here to do research-on-demand! This forum is to give support for our products only, not to do homework for you what the origin is of wrinkles on your skin for which you don't even provide a photo. You don't even put in the effort to borrow someone's phone but I have to research the medical literature for you, and if I don't manage, "hit" a couple of plastic surgeons??

Despite your polite phrasing, this is disrespectful.

Note: I just banned this forum member from further posting.

523
Dermarolling / Microneedling / Re: Needling healthy tissue?
« on: January 12, 2013, 03:00:59 PM »
Scar tissue (stretch marks are scars too) contains thick and dense collagen bundles. If you manage to crush the bundles, it will smoothe the texture and often even improve the color of the scar. A dermastamp or single needles are more effective tools for that.  Also, scar tissue is harder to penetrate for the needles than scar-free tissue and to "crush" it, it needs dense, "aggressive"  dermaneedling. There is no problem to hit scar-less skin but you should concentrate on the scar tissue because that is your target.  Scar tissue has also very low metabolic activity and dermaneedling often improves it a little.

There is neither any problem with using a regular dermaroller over stretch marks; on the contrary, it is very useful but the most effective approach for scars is to combine a dermaroller (roll over the entire area) with a more targeted tool (a dermstamp or the single needle) that concentrates on individual scars.

524
In your case, hormonal therapy will very likely be much more effective than anything else to stop your hair loss. You may for example suffer from polycystic ovary syndrome:

http://forums.owndoc.com/dermarolling-microneedling/breakouts-at-30/

I have not received much feedback concerning dermarolling and hair loss so I cannot give objective information about it. Perhaps someone will post here about his/her experience.

Related subject:

http://forums.owndoc.com/dermarolling-microneedling/dermarolling-for-thinning-hair/

525
Dermarolling (using a device that rolls the skin) is one of several forms of dermaneedling. Other forms of dermaneedling are dermastamping and single-needling, using devices without moving parts.

Needling and microneedling should really be used as synonyms for dermaneedling but those terms are most often used for dermaneedling done by single needles or dermastamps.

To make a long story short: All these words mean the same thing: Using needles on your skin.