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Author Topic: when can i resume using my regular face cream after rolling  (Read 9522 times)

Anna

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when can i resume using my regular face cream after rolling
« on: November 29, 2010, 11:01:16 PM »
Hi Sarah, I just received my package today Im so excited!!! but i do have a couple of questions if you dont mind i want to get this right before i attempt to roll; ok, how long do i wait before using my regular face cream( which contains antioxidants and whatnot )so as not to interfere with the collagen being rebuilt? and do i apply infadolan immediatelly after rolling or do i wait a day or two? and seeing i have oily acne prone skin is it a good idea to use a heavier cream like infadolan? if not what can i use as a substitute? thanks in advance, Anna

SarahVaughter

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when can i resume using my regular face cream after rolling
« Reply #1 on: November 30, 2010, 12:54:02 PM »
Infadolan is a protective and regenerative ointment that should be applied (just a little) immediately after rolling with long needles (longer than 0.5 mm). Initially the skin is dry and rough after rolling and should be well protected.

  After a day or two (depending how quickly you heal) you can start your normal routines (except for peels or harsh exfoliation). Antioxidant creams do not interfere with collagen production, you can use your regular creams without any restriction.

   

  I know that Aquaphor is often recommended for first two days after Fraxel laser but I think it is also an ointment.

  If protective ointments cause you breakouts, use a cream that you already know doesn’t cause you breakouts. It is very difficult for me to name any because some acne sufferers claim breaking out after creams that didn’t cause breakouts in other acne suffers so it is more a matter of individual experience.

   

  I answered a similar question here: Scroll down to my reply posted on November 30th, 2010 06:40 AM

   

  http://forums.owndoc.com/dermarolling-microneedling/Questions-about-your-vit-A-D-ointment-Infadolan
My comments should not be considered medical advice.

The dermaneedling part of our site is http://owndoc.com/dermarolling/

Our digital dermaneedling device ($170 for home users and clinics): http://derminator.com/

Derminator videos: https://www.youtube.com/user/owndoc/videos?flow=grid

Anna

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when can i resume using my regular face cream after rolling
« Reply #2 on: November 30, 2010, 03:23:31 PM »
ok thank you so much

Anna

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when can i resume using my regular face cream after rolling
« Reply #3 on: November 30, 2010, 03:33:01 PM »
oh btw i just read an older thread about avoiding anti inflammitory creams, if the cream i use has those properties do i need to avoid using it or can i still use t after a period of time?

SarahVaughter

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when can i resume using my regular face cream after rolling
« Reply #4 on: December 01, 2010, 02:22:29 PM »
You can use such a cream two days after microneedling.
My comments should not be considered medical advice.

The dermaneedling part of our site is http://owndoc.com/dermarolling/

Our digital dermaneedling device ($170 for home users and clinics): http://derminator.com/

Derminator videos: https://www.youtube.com/user/owndoc/videos?flow=grid

Anna

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when can i resume using my regular face cream after rolling
« Reply #5 on: December 01, 2010, 05:09:18 PM »
thank you again

kakalakingma

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when can i resume using my regular face cream after rolling
« Reply #6 on: December 05, 2010, 09:09:21 PM »
SarahVaughter;859 wrote: You can use such a cream two days after microneedling.

 

Wait, really, Sarah?

I thought the healing process depends on each individual with the whole mild-inflammatory process. Can someone really heal that fast (2 days) with 1.5-mm needle? If you applied anti-inflammatory products on your skin during that process, you are not optimizing the collegan and remodeling benefits of microneedling, right?

SarahVaughter

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when can i resume using my regular face cream after rolling
« Reply #7 on: December 06, 2010, 06:29:57 AM »
Inflammation doesn’t last that long after dermarolling. Please read my posting about the nature of inflammation:

   

  http://forums.owndoc.com/dermarolling-microneedling/How-long-does-the-inflammation-stage-lasts-after-rolling-with-long-needles

In micro-injuries, the inflammatory stage rapidly completes, whereas collagen production and other triggered responses continue. They are unaffected by anti-inflammatories.  

   The full cycle of skin remodeling and collagen production takes several months because it is in fact a complex biochemical trajectory that is followed. The initial type of collagen is very slowly altered into a more permanent type of collagen. This is a non-inflammatory process.
My comments should not be considered medical advice.

The dermaneedling part of our site is http://owndoc.com/dermarolling/

Our digital dermaneedling device ($170 for home users and clinics): http://derminator.com/

Derminator videos: https://www.youtube.com/user/owndoc/videos?flow=grid

Anna

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when can i resume using my regular face cream after rolling
« Reply #8 on: December 06, 2010, 07:31:03 AM »
ok, so I was going to use my other face cream that does contain antiinflammitories but I've been sticking with infadolan because even though it feels a little greasy it hasn't broke me up AND is probably the reason my redness calmed down so fast plus I had a few red marks from some break outs I had a week ago and it lightened them up like really fast so I'm gonna keep using this stuff I llove it

kakalakingma

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when can i resume using my regular face cream after rolling
« Reply #9 on: December 06, 2010, 10:00:09 AM »
SarahVaughter;897 wrote: Inflammation doesn’t last that long after dermarolling. Please read my posting about the nature of inflammation:

   

  http://forums.owndoc.com/dermarolling-microneedling/How-long-does-the-inflammation-stage-lasts-after-rolling-with-long-needles

In micro-injuries, the inflammatory stage rapidly completes, whereas collagen production and other triggered responses continue. They are unaffected by anti-inflammatories.  

   The full cycle of skin remodeling and collagen production takes several months because it is in fact a complex biochemical trajectory that is followed. The initial type of collagen is very slowly altered into a more permanent type of collagen. This is a non-inflammatory process.

 

Yeah, Sarah, I have read that post before. Thanks for bringing it up. But let me just ask for clarification: the micro-injuries from 1.5mm derma rolling is acute inflammatory stage or what? Because on your other post you state that acute inflammatory stage takes a few days and depends on how long the needle is.  I think this is where I got concerned about the 2 days thing. Like, is a few  days equivalent to 2 days or just depends on the individual as they see if all the signs of inflammation (redness, swelling, increased heat, pain) are good then they are good. Well thanks anyway

SarahVaughter

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when can i resume using my regular face cream after rolling
« Reply #10 on: December 07, 2010, 03:25:59 PM »
Yes, it is an acute inflammatory stage. It can take hours or a couple of days but the injuries from dermarolling are miniscule and in most cases the acute inflammation subsides within 24 hours after rolling with long needles. It may take longer with single needling since it is a denser, more aggressive method. The intensity of the inflammation depends on the severity of the injury.

   

  Even if there was some residual inflammation after two days, it is not a big deal to apply a cream that is a part of your daily routine. Just don't apply a strong anti-inflammatory product right after dermarolling.

  This graph shows the stages of healing. Keep in mind that it pertains to serious injuries and wounds.

   

 

   

  Source: http://www.bmj.com/content/332/7547/962.full

                      Attached files
My comments should not be considered medical advice.

The dermaneedling part of our site is http://owndoc.com/dermarolling/

Our digital dermaneedling device ($170 for home users and clinics): http://derminator.com/

Derminator videos: https://www.youtube.com/user/owndoc/videos?flow=grid

kakalakingma

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when can i resume using my regular face cream after rolling
« Reply #11 on: December 07, 2010, 09:44:05 PM »
WOW! This is a beautiful picture. I wish I saw this diagram sooner. Well, thanks for the clarification.

Oh wait, what about medium chemical peel? How does that acute inflammation last before it subsides? Say a 35% glycolic acid or 50% lactic acid?

SarahVaughter

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when can i resume using my regular face cream after rolling
« Reply #12 on: December 09, 2010, 05:07:48 PM »
They are both superficial peels and the inflammation will subside very quickly.  

 

  Classification of chemical peels:

Exfoliation - can be used daily

AHA 5-10%

Retinoids

Very superficial peels

Alpha-hydroxy acid (AHA) - glycolic acid and lactic acid up to 50%

Beta-hydroxy acid - (BHA) - salicylic acid (excellent for acne prone skin since it cleans pores)

Trichloroacetic acid (TCA) up to 10%

Superficial peels - reach the epidermis - usually performed every 4-6 weeks

AHA - up to 70% (left from 2 to 20 min)

BHA

  TCA up to 30%

Jessner’s solution – (contains 14% resorcinol, 14% salicylic acid, 14% lactic acid and ethanol)



Medium depth peels - reach the papillary dermis - usually performed once in 6-12 months.


TCA 30% to 40%

Glycolic acid 70% + 35% TCA

Jessner’s solution + 35% TCA

Glycolic acid 70%



Deep peels - reach the reticular dermis - Can be performed once every few years or once in a lifetime.


TCA 50% or more

Phenol

The depth of penetration depends on many variables:

The concentration of the peel

The pH of the peel

Thickness of the skin

How many layers of the peel are applied

How long it stays on
My comments should not be considered medical advice.

The dermaneedling part of our site is http://owndoc.com/dermarolling/

Our digital dermaneedling device ($170 for home users and clinics): http://derminator.com/

Derminator videos: https://www.youtube.com/user/owndoc/videos?flow=grid