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Author Topic: Suction Method - Why should it work on needled skin?  (Read 5028 times)

h2k

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Suction Method - Why should it work on needled skin?
« on: June 17, 2013, 11:55:07 PM »
For subcision, the cuts are pulled away by suctioning them (force is normal the cut). This makes sense. However, for needling the suctioning is "in-line" with the cut. Therefore, nothing is really being pulled apart.

So why would we expect the suctioning method to work at all? The reason I ask is that I decided to just go for this method from the start. The problem is that it creates a lot of redness and bruising and its hard to work and go in public like this. So I am just wondering if there is any real benefit. It just doesn't seem at all like the approach used for subcision. I have seen some success stories, but who knows if needling alone would have had the same benefit.

Is the current belief to just "give it a shot" and hope for the best? Is there a logical reason to expect suctioning would work in conjunction with needling?

SarahVaughter

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Re: Suction Method - Why should it work on needled skin?
« Reply #1 on: June 20, 2013, 06:03:10 PM »
Suctioning should only be used on scars that very likely are tethered (the rolling type of acne scars) or on scars that have resisted all other treatments (in the latter case suctioning is experimental, as a last resort kind of self-treatment).
 
Needling does not cut the fibers but disrupts them and suctioning stretches them. Saline injections for example are done after a subcision but not always. Mere saline injection (without subcision) that just stretches the fibers sometimes improve indented scars. More about saline injections here:
 
http://forums.owndoc.com/dermarolling-microneedling/Saline-injections-for-acne-scars
 
Needling the skin prior to suctioning makes bruising after suctioning almost inevitable. Getting bruises may further help improving scars because autologous blood injections were found to improve scars:
 
http://forums.owndoc.com/dermarolling-microneedling/autologous-%28own%29-blood-injection-for-acne-scars-or-atrophic-scars/
 
Nothing prevents you from going to a doctor for a real subcision but our website is aimed at self-treatment and real horizontal subcision to cut the fibers is too risky to be done as self-treatment. It can leave scars.
 
I understand that it is difficult to walk around with bruises. You should try everything else first and only if it doesn’t help, add suctioning.
 
Scars are in general very difficult to improve with all current methods, even the most advanced and expensive ones. A combination of approaches is often necessary. Unfortunately, there is no magic solution and if nothing works, you have to start with "try and see" methods until you basically exhausted your options.
 
Many of our customers spent thousands of dollars on laser treatments or acid peels without any improvement. If the suction method does not improve your scars, you lost 19 dollars.
« Last Edit: June 20, 2013, 06:04:37 PM by SarahVaughter »
My comments should not be considered medical advice.

The dermaneedling part of our site is http://owndoc.com/dermarolling/

Our digital dermaneedling device ($170 for home users and clinics): http://derminator.com/

Derminator videos: https://www.youtube.com/user/owndoc/videos?flow=grid

fusion

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Re: Suction Method - Why should it work on needled skin?
« Reply #2 on: October 09, 2013, 09:53:33 PM »
I'd like to add that I've tried needling and stamping some indented chicken pox scars around a year ago for 4-5 months. My skin healed well in combination with infadolan so i did this every fortnight.

While it improved the texture of the skin and made the scar tissue softer (I even noticed a tiny pimple growing on the scar tissue the other week), the actual indentation has not improved and so i gave up because my priority was reducing the depth of the scar.

However i recently ordered the suction pump and am going to "give that a shot" as you put it.
Logically it makes sense, it's cheap and I don't really have anything to lose.

rachelplmr

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Re: Suction Method - Why should it work on needled skin?
« Reply #3 on: October 10, 2013, 02:42:45 AM »
Hi iv found I look a mess for 2 weeks after stamping and rolling anyway I call it downtime or no pain no gain, so i soppose the redness or slight brusing from suctioning i never really noticed but i do believe the suctioning does work in conjuction with the stamp and my scarring was really really bad I have rolling box and ice but im slowly getting there after 6 treatments  I do admit I have been needling for 3 yrs but I dont count it becouse I sadly found out were id been buying them was fake and they was not penatrating the skin so I count from when I found own doc or sarahs forum
Good luck dont give up else we never know what might have been   

SarahVaughter

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Re: Suction Method - Why should it work on needled skin?
« Reply #4 on: October 10, 2013, 01:25:21 PM »
Thank you, Rachel, and good luck with your scars!
My comments should not be considered medical advice.

The dermaneedling part of our site is http://owndoc.com/dermarolling/

Our digital dermaneedling device ($170 for home users and clinics): http://derminator.com/

Derminator videos: https://www.youtube.com/user/owndoc/videos?flow=grid

ostojewa2

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Re: Suction Method - Why should it work on needled skin?
« Reply #5 on: October 10, 2013, 03:00:07 PM »
I have additional question to the topic. Are there any medical/research articles in which the suction method is discussed? Any clinical trials?

SarahVaughter

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My comments should not be considered medical advice.

The dermaneedling part of our site is http://owndoc.com/dermarolling/

Our digital dermaneedling device ($170 for home users and clinics): http://derminator.com/

Derminator videos: https://www.youtube.com/user/owndoc/videos?flow=grid