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Author Topic: Skin-identical Ingredients | Barrier-Repair Ingredients | Natural Moisturizing Factor and Derma Rolling  (Read 6965 times)

kakalakingma

  • Guest
Hi Sarah,

    I have known about the interconnected terms "skin-identical ingredients" S-II or "barrier repair ingredients" or "Natural Moisturizing Factor" NMF for a while now and I only think of them for topical application on intact skin. But what about on needled skin? :confused::confused::confused:

     According to the Cosmetics Cop, Ms. Begoun states that the benefits of S-IIs and NMF are: "An intact, stable, healthy, and strong mortar structure is what allows skin to look smooth, soft, moist, supple, and young". When skin is depleted of S-II and NMF, this leads to not only "water loss, flakiness, and inflexible, stiff, uncomfortable-feeling skin is the result. It is of vital importance for all skin types to maintain or restore the skin’s mortar (intercellular matrix) to help skin fight off environmental stresses and most certainly look younger" but also "the skin’s healing process is impaired". (NOTE: links provided above)

    So this is what I am thinking: knowing that when the skin is needled, the tiny holes are wounds that may be considered as the skin being impaired of its barrier. Therefore, it would be wise to apply those ingredients that mimics the skin's barrier to promote faster healing. What do you think?

    But the thing is, would promoting barrier repair interfere with skin remodeling if one were to apply copper peptide right after rolling? When I think of skin remodeling, I think of stimulation of collagen and elastin and removing old scar tissue and form new ones and so on in a complex biological process. However, intercellular matrix has to do with a different assortment of skin substances such as cholesterol, ceramides, hyaluronic acid, glycosaminoglycans, etc. So.... I need your insight here Sarah or anyone out there! When you damage your skin with a 1.5mm, you are damaging deeper than just the barrier, should you just focus on the remodeling of the skin and not the barrier?

    I know, I know, one can say: why don't you just slab some vaseline or Infadolan on and let the skin regenerate its barrier on its own. Well... okay, but ... hmm......... Can you use both? Would it be better to use both? :confused::confused::confused::confused:

    So excited and scared I am derma rolling in a few days!

[update: I won't be derma rolling soon, my order of copper peptide has not arrived and I am not going through without it. Kind of frustrating, i really want to do it this weekend. Man! I'll do my chemical peel first, thenl]

Anna

  • Guest
I dunno I would just use the infadolan and let your skin take care of the rest you have to be careful of what you put on there after needling your skin feels quite stingy and slightly sore from all the needling and you're gonna want to put something soothing on there and the infadolan was I say just the thing

kakalakingma

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You make good point. I do have a feeling it can sting me. But, then again, I don't mind doing a small patch test somewhere...checks or forehead.

I don't have infadolan, but I do have vaseline. Lol.

SarahVaughter

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When you are young, there is no need to supply the skin with many substances that the skin already normally contains unless your skin is somehow "impaired". You should always protect your skin from the excessive sun exposure (some moderate exposure is wise because we get vit. D from the sun), protect the skin from extreme weather conditions (cold, wind or excessive dryness), do not overdo it with the frequency of skin cleansing because it takes the natural oily protective film off the skin and do not overdo exfoliation or acid peels either.  The more is not automatically the better in skin care.

     

  Dry skin doesn't need an external water supply. Dry skin is caused by excessive evaporation of water from the skin and that has to be prevented by an oily barrier.

   

  One of the best moisturizers that is efficient but not heavy is almond oil. Wet a cotton pad, add almond oil and clean your face with it. It will clean the skin and at the same time it serves as a good moisturizer.

   

  On non-facial skin use even heavier moisturizers such as for example Eucerin for dry skin with 10% urea.

   You can compare it with hormones. There is no need to supply our body with hormones that our body normally produces until we have a hormonal disorder or until the levels of hormones diminished with age (such as estrogen after menopause etc). You should clean and protect the skin but if you are young, you do not have to pump into the skin everything a healthy skin normally produces. The skin itself will do take care of this and we do not want to make the skin "lazy". There is evidence that when levels of nutrients are kept artificially high for a long time, that this diminishes ( it is reversible)  the natural capacity of our body to utilize them. This is provenly the case in vit. C megadosing, for example.

  After dermarolling with long needles, the skin protection is impaired for a while.

   

  Infadolan is an outstanding barrier moisturizer:

   

  http://forums.owndoc.com/dermarolling-microneedling/Why-Infadolan-works-on-wrinkles

   

  ..and it protects the skin. That is why we recommend it after dermarolling.
My comments should not be considered medical advice.

The dermaneedling part of our site is http://owndoc.com/dermarolling/

Our digital dermaneedling device ($170 for home users and clinics): http://derminator.com/

Derminator videos: https://www.youtube.com/user/owndoc/videos?flow=grid

Anna

  • Guest
I dunno about vaseline that has a different consistency than infadolan it's thinner plus it doesn't have the a d vitamins but hey whatever floats your boat lol

kakalakingma

  • Guest
@ Sarah,

 Okay, so I guess I will avoid using product with all of those S-IIs. Then again, can you really make or "manipulate" your skin to become lazy if the derma rolling session is done several weeks apart? It's not like you roll every day and apply S-II everytime afterwards, which I can see then may potentially cause your skin to adapt to being "lazy".

I like your analogy about the with the vitamin C and hormones. But I do would like to know if those S-II are considered nutrients as vitamin C. Is there a limit to the production of S-IIs in the skin? Can skin cells in particular get lazy in terms of producing S-IIs? Was the megadosing Vitamin C study referring to topically applied vitamin C or internal? Sun damage, I'd like to generalize, depletes your natural antioxidants and damage barrier components whenever exposed to sun light. Sooo.. I don't think it would hurt to apply topically S-II on a daily basis. In the cosmetic industry, there is hundreds and hundreds of moisturizers that contain these ingredients and people use them on a daily basis generally. How would any one really know if their skin is becoming lazy, really? And can that be comparable if S-II were to be applied on rolling wounds? Hmmm.... but you have a point, Sarah and thank you.

kakalakingma

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@ Anna,

Yeah, I don't like Vaseline consistency on my face AT ALL! But I can endure it for that very night after rolling. *fingers crossed*. You are absolutely right, Infadolan has two beneficial ingredients Vaseline don't have, that is, Vitamin A and D. I can I pull off vitamin A for a few days. I do use Tretinoin on other days, so I hope it shouldn't be a big deal.

SarahVaughter

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And don't forget the Lanolin. Vaseline doesn't have Lanolin, a most excellent natural moisturizer. Vaseline is a byproduct of the oil industry, Lanolin is a result of hundreds of millions of years of skin evolution* in sheep who've always been outside.

* Or of our good Lord in Heaven.
My comments should not be considered medical advice.

The dermaneedling part of our site is http://owndoc.com/dermarolling/

Our digital dermaneedling device ($170 for home users and clinics): http://derminator.com/

Derminator videos: https://www.youtube.com/user/owndoc/videos?flow=grid

kakalakingma

  • Guest
Oh yeah, You have mention good things about lanolin. I heard that Petrolatum (vaseline) goes through a  lot of process to make it pure, so I don't think there is any negatives to that.

SarahVaughter

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kakalakingma;1204 wrote: @ Sarah,

   

  Okay, so I guess I will avoid using product with all of those S-IIs. Then again, can you really make or "manipulate" your skin to become lazy if the derma rolling session is done several weeks apart?

   

     

  There is no reason to avoid it. You take my posts into extremes..

   

  No you cannot make your skin "lazy" by using it once a while. Sorry I actually overlooked that you mentioned you want to use it after rolling with a 1.5 mm dermaroller. That is perfectly OK and you can use it in between rolling as well.

     

  What I wanted to say is that if you are 20 y. old or even 25 y. old, there is no need to force-feed the skin on a daily basis with things the skin naturally produces. Let your skin take care of it. When you are 40 and older then it is time to supply the skin with some of this.

   

  The situation is a bit different concerning vitamins. The human body cannot synthesize vit. C. We get it from food. To get a high skin concentration, an external application is advisable.

   

  Vit. A is easily depleted because it is light sensitive and a moderate external application is advisable.

   

  Sources of vit. D are certain foods and UV (sun) exposure. If you live in a cold country or use high factor sun protection, you might not get enough vit. D and at least moderate external application will certainly not harm the skin.
My comments should not be considered medical advice.

The dermaneedling part of our site is http://owndoc.com/dermarolling/

Our digital dermaneedling device ($170 for home users and clinics): http://derminator.com/

Derminator videos: https://www.youtube.com/user/owndoc/videos?flow=grid