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Author Topic: Pooled blood under skin  (Read 1772 times)

lef

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Pooled blood under skin
« on: November 22, 2012, 01:24:02 AM »
I used a single needle purchased from your website for a wide stretch mark on my abdomen. It was going fine until I noticed a bit of blood in one prick as soon as I removed the needle, then, almost immediately, that area under my skin pooled with blood. There's a bluish-purple circle (about the size of a dime) under my skin.

I'm assuming this isn't normal. Is it just going to be a bad bruise? Does the blood get reabsorbed? Do I need to go to the doctor? I wouldn't have been surprised by some bruising after the fact, but this is a bit alarming.

SarahVaughter

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Re: Pooled blood under skin
« Reply #1 on: November 22, 2012, 05:55:12 AM »
I'm sorry - it will disappear but it will take weeks.

Your experience is why we don't sell those needles anymore, and have designed better needles.

The problem with our previous needles is that the tolerance was too high, meaning that some of them were about 2 mm long or sometimes even longer. We did manual inspection of all of them but sometimes a too-long one slipped through. The result was that occasionally (1 in 100 customers perhaps) there was severe bruising reported and also subcutaneous bleeding.

You could perhaps photograph the needle next to a ruler with a camera on macro setting, then you can see exactly how long it is. I suspect you got a too long a needle, or your skin at that spot is particularly thin, or you have veins right below the surface (lack of subcutaneous fat).

Our upcoming single needles are all 1.8 mm long.

Please do not worry about this. Bruising and the perfusion of blood plasma is strongly associated with dramatic skin improvement, when needling. It will take time for the coagulated blood to be reabsorbed by the body.

Related forum posting:
http://forums.owndoc.com/dermarolling-microneedling/single-needling-bruises/
« Last Edit: November 22, 2012, 06:55:49 AM by SarahVaughter »
I am not a medical doctor and my comments should not be considered medical advice.

The dermaneedling part of our site is http://owndoc.com/category/dermarolling/

legolas123

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Re: Pooled blood under skin
« Reply #2 on: December 01, 2012, 03:42:48 PM »
there is risk of hemosiderin stain with these bruises and this pooled  blood?there is the risk that this is permanent? thank you

SarahVaughter

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Re: Pooled blood under skin
« Reply #3 on: December 06, 2012, 02:48:06 PM »
Hemosiderin stains (long-lasting rust-color iron pigment left after significant bruising) are very rare and most people will never get them even after serious bruising.  If you are prone to them, you would have likely noticed them in the past. Hemosiderin stains are different from ordinary, common hyperpigmentation. Hemosiderin  stains is iron that is left behind after other components in the blood have been cleared up after bruising. Hemosiderin stains disappear with time but it can take a year.

Ordinary hyperpigmentation is caused by overproduction of the pigment melanin that is normally present in the skin and makes up the color of our skin.
Melanin is our natural UV filter and more is produced upon sun exposure. In some individuals, the skin reacts to an injury or long-term inflammation (for example in acne) by overproducing melanin in the area. In certain conditions such as Melasma or Chloasma, the reason why the skin overproduces melanin is unknown.  Freckles, age spots etc. contain melanin.  Melanin pigmentation usually responds to whitening products such as hydroquinone (the deeper the melanin is in the skin the harder it is to get rid of it).

It is very important to protect hyperpigmentation-prone skin from the sun.
I am not a medical doctor and my comments should not be considered medical advice.

The dermaneedling part of our site is http://owndoc.com/category/dermarolling/