Derminator



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Author Topic: NEW TO DERMAROLLING  (Read 4064 times)

10Sylvia5

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« on: May 10, 2011, 05:24:58 PM »
This has probably been asked soo many times before but this is the first time for me!

I have just done  1mm roll  using ice, and yes it was sore!! I got very lobster with pin prick bleeding most on forehead.

I put your infaldon (Lovely!) on still stingy but not really sore. Have I done it right?

On the eds site there are a few people advocating really heavy rolls with lots of bleeding as  one correct way of doing it. I am now thinking maybe I didnt press hard enough

Sarah and anyone else I would value your opinions.

Its sore only with ice and I think I am a chicken!

SarahVaughter

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NEW TO DERMAROLLING
« Reply #1 on: May 11, 2011, 11:36:47 AM »
Yes, you have done it correctly.

   

  Our skin is our main protective organ and feeling pain is our body's protective reaction, otherwise we would seriously injure ourselves without even noticing it.

   

  If you soften the skin prior to dermarolling (by having a hot bath, steaming your face or using some keratolytics such as salicylic acid) it should be a bit less painful.

   Occasional pinpoint bleeding is completely normal but we have customers who get no pinpoint bleeding on the face with a 2 mm dermaroller and also those who get quite some pinpoint bleeding with a 0.5 mm on their face.

   

  Both it is OK. It depends on the thickness of your skin, on the density and depth of vascularisation etc.

   

  Doing very deep dermarollings (3 mm) with lots of blood should be done only in a clinical setting. There is no evidence that those very deep dermarollings are more effective than deep dermarollings (such as 1.5 mm).

   

  You can go deeper locally with the single needle on individual deep scars.

   

  In order to induce collagen, you have to reach the dermis. In most people, a 0.5 mm dermaroller already reaches the top of the dermis (it depends where you roll because the thickness of the skin varies in different skin areas and skin thickness in general varies in people).

   

  Oh, now I noticed you did not write -very deep rolls- but -heavy rolls-.  I am not sure what exactly it means. Deep or dense or both?  Honestly, nobody knows what dermarolling regimen is absolutely optimal for various skin conditions. It doesn't mean that doing a less optimal regimen will not bring results. It will just take a little longer.

  When you know how your skin reacts to dermarolling, you can roll more densely.

   

  There are people with very sensitive skin that cannot handle dense dermarolling etc. That is why my instructions are always on the conservative  side, and our customers can adjust for their skin type and needs and even experiment a little.
My comments should not be considered medical advice.

The dermaneedling part of our site is http://owndoc.com/dermarolling/

Our digital dermaneedling device ($170 for home users and clinics): http://derminator.com/

Derminator videos: https://www.youtube.com/user/owndoc/videos?flow=grid

10Sylvia5

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NEW TO DERMAROLLING
« Reply #2 on: May 11, 2011, 03:52:25 PM »
thanks Sarah, you have reasurred me. Actually I wasnt quite sure what they meant by "heavy rolls" I think they meant pushing hard until there is bleeding! I really didnt want to do that as my skin is quite sensitive and dry at times, and can react allergically to things.

I am also a coward when it comes to inflicting pain on myself! And was quite proud I managed to do the roll and get what I did more would be too much!

I also have a funny feeling that I wouldnt be able to use EMLA as I am on Atenolol for ventricular tachicardia so ice will have to do.

Thanks again your website is a revelation

PS I read your article on ms and lyme disease, Incredible I have a friend with Ms and she has to know this!!

FINLEY

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« Reply #3 on: May 12, 2011, 12:48:25 AM »
Do you know a good source for salicylic acid?  Thanks.

SarahVaughter

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« Reply #4 on: May 13, 2011, 04:41:02 PM »
Keratolytic agents are for example salicylic acid, urea, lactic acid, and allantoin. They are used in creams for cracked heels, callus removal or Psoriasis and contain about 5% Salicylic acid and 10 % Urea. You can buy Kerasal(tm) or something similar.

   Salicylic acid is often found in acne products. Unfortunately I can't recommend a source.

   

  It will soften the skin but do not expect that the needles will then go into the skin easily. The skin will be still tough, just a little less.

   

  Our skin is designed not to soften easily. Because this would compromise its protective ability and we would be prone to injury and at the mercy of infectious agents.
My comments should not be considered medical advice.

The dermaneedling part of our site is http://owndoc.com/dermarolling/

Our digital dermaneedling device ($170 for home users and clinics): http://derminator.com/

Derminator videos: https://www.youtube.com/user/owndoc/videos?flow=grid