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Author Topic: needling/dermarolling hypertrophic scar  (Read 20180 times)

cheryl90

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needling/dermarolling hypertrophic scar
« on: December 28, 2011, 02:10:30 AM »
Hi Sarah,

Just wondering if you have received any positive feedbacks frm customers regarding single needling / dermarolling for hypertrophic scars (not keloid)

Thanks !

SarahVaughter

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needling/dermarolling hypertrophic scar
« Reply #1 on: December 29, 2011, 02:13:58 PM »
Yes I have. Hypertrophic scars often flatten, soften and improve in color amd texture after repeated needling. They will not disappear (unless superficial) and they do not shrink in size, except for flattening. They became much less visible.

     

  >

My comments should not be considered medical advice.

The dermaneedling part of our site is http://owndoc.com/dermarolling/

Our digital dermaneedling device ($170 for home users and clinics): http://derminator.com/

Derminator videos: https://www.youtube.com/user/owndoc/videos?flow=grid

cheryl90

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needling/dermarolling hypertrophic scar
« Reply #2 on: December 30, 2011, 10:27:02 AM »
Hi Sarah,

thanks for your reply.

I understand that needling helps to induce collagen but a hypertrophic scar is caused when theres too much collagen in the scar tissue, no? if thats the case then wouldnt needling the hypertrophic scar make it worse since its already abundant in collagen.

SarahVaughter

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needling/dermarolling hypertrophic scar
« Reply #3 on: December 30, 2011, 02:21:32 PM »
Scar tissue, whether raised, flat or indented is abundant in collagen but the scar collagen is thick and typically woven in a different pattern than in the normal skin.

   

  Scar tissue isn't really different from normal skin, however the thickness and patterns of the fibers are different.

   

  Crushing the scar tissue will crush the scar pattern of the fibers and the body will often remodel the scar into a better looking, softer scar.

   

  Our body does not fix something that is not "broken". Scar tissue is just a cosmetic problem, it is not perceived as "broken" by our body. Needling or dermarolling is a trick to make the body remodel the scar. Making tiny pricks is not enough to cause a scar but it is enough for the body to see needled/rolled skin as "broken" and trigger healing processes. Unfortunately, our body usually does not bother replacing the scar tissue completely with normal skin - especially when the scar is deep - but it often replaces it with a mixture of scar and normal tissue, producing a better looking scar.

   

  Needling/dermarolling triggers healing processes and the body tends to heal the area in a way, at least partially, as it normally should be. Indented scars fill in and raised scars flatten. It does not work in 100% of cases but in many cases it works.

   

  Whatever you use, always make a test patch first to see how it heals.

   

  When we get an injury that is serious, the body will quickly fix it with scar tissue to prevent an infection etc. The scar "glues" the skin together.

   

  Needling or dermarolling does not produce scar tissue. When you needle or roll normal skin, it will heal as normal skin.

  When you needle or roll a scar, it will often improve the scar but unfortunately, as I said, the body "refuses" to completely replace deep scars with normal tissue. Evolution apparently did not deem it necessary. So far, nothing exists that can completely remove a deep scar.

   

  You should not needle or roll keloid scars. It could make them grow larger.
My comments should not be considered medical advice.

The dermaneedling part of our site is http://owndoc.com/dermarolling/

Our digital dermaneedling device ($170 for home users and clinics): http://derminator.com/

Derminator videos: https://www.youtube.com/user/owndoc/videos?flow=grid

cheryl90

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needling/dermarolling hypertrophic scar
« Reply #4 on: December 30, 2011, 07:06:56 PM »
hi sarah, thank you for your valuable information!

is it ok to needle moles? im referring to those small flat ones on my face.

SarahVaughter

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needling/dermarolling hypertrophic scar
« Reply #5 on: January 02, 2012, 01:51:05 PM »
No, you should not needle moles. If your moles were checked by a doctor and they are not pre-cancerous, you do not have to avoid them when rolling but needling a mole won't remove it.
My comments should not be considered medical advice.

The dermaneedling part of our site is http://owndoc.com/dermarolling/

Our digital dermaneedling device ($170 for home users and clinics): http://derminator.com/

Derminator videos: https://www.youtube.com/user/owndoc/videos?flow=grid