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Author Topic: Indented/Sunken scar on nosetip  (Read 7148 times)

SomethingGood

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Indented/Sunken scar on nosetip
« on: June 26, 2012, 10:34:32 AM »
Hello Sarah and everyone else on this forum!

First of all, thank you for an amazing forum and service. I really appreciate what you do and what you're selling!

I have been reading alot here on the forums, but I feel that I need personal advice on what I can do for my scar.
I have this scar on my nose tip, not amazingly big, but a bit sunken and casts a shadow when seen from different angles.
Out in the sunlight it's almost invisible, so it's not very bad but I want to improve it a bit and I was told needling should work.

I'm planning to get the single needles here from this shop here at OwnDoc, but I have also read about Copper Peptides which should be
very good pushing out these scars to skin level. I want to try it out. I have tried needling my scar with a DermaStamp which didn't do a lot, it was only 0.5 mm though but to be honest, I have no clue on what to use or exactly how often to do it, there so many different opinons on this. Anyways, I have taken some pictures, and will love to get some feedback on how to go on with this scar.

I'm thankful for all comments.

Thanks in advance! :)
« Last Edit: June 26, 2012, 10:35:48 AM by SomethingGood »

SarahVaughter

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Re: Indented/Sunken scar on nosetip
« Reply #1 on: June 29, 2012, 06:46:55 AM »
I actually think that a 0.5 mm dermastamp is a good choice in this case and you do not need the single needle. How many times have you stamped?

You can stamp twice a week.

If the scar is not improving after several months, add the suction method.

The suction method is worth trying. In general, only the rolling type of acne scars is tethered to the underlying structures but it has never been thoroughly investigated and it is very well possible that all indented scars are tethered to the underlying structures to certain extent.

The main reason for indentation is missing tissue/skin atrophy (this will be improved by microneedling).

Fibrotic bands that tether the scar down are an additional factor keeping the scar indented. The tethering may or may not be present in the scar but you do not know so trying the suctioning method to loosen the bands is a good idea:

http://forums.owndoc.com/dermarolling-microneedling/subcision-suction-method-for-acne-scars
My comments should not be considered medical advice.

The dermaneedling part of our site is http://owndoc.com/dermarolling/

Our digital dermaneedling device ($170 for home users and clinics): http://derminator.com/

Derminator videos: https://www.youtube.com/user/owndoc/videos?flow=grid

SomethingGood

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Re: Indented/Sunken scar on nosetip
« Reply #2 on: June 29, 2012, 10:37:34 AM »
I have been fairly careful with stamping. I read that the scar should get the enough healing time between each times.
Because of that, I have tried stamping once every 3/4 weeks. But that hasn't changed the scar at all. I also wonder how many times I should stamp each time. I stamped 10-15 times once and thought that was OK. It also hurts very bad on that area because of the tiny skin layer.

So Sarah, you don't recommend Copper peptides in order to break down the scar tissue? I see that you have some of this in your store, but will that make the scar even worse since it's on my nose?

Thanks for your time, very much appreciated!

SarahVaughter

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Re: Indented/Sunken scar on nosetip
« Reply #3 on: July 01, 2012, 04:46:48 PM »
Yes, stamping 10-15 times is enough.

Indented scars are not easy to solve (especially if on the nose) and trying various approaches is often necessary. So, if the scar is not responding to stamping itself, combine it with copper peptides or the suction method.
 
Unfortunately, there is no single approach that works in 100% of cases and 100% of skin conditions. Each individual has to improvise a little.
My comments should not be considered medical advice.

The dermaneedling part of our site is http://owndoc.com/dermarolling/

Our digital dermaneedling device ($170 for home users and clinics): http://derminator.com/

Derminator videos: https://www.youtube.com/user/owndoc/videos?flow=grid