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Author Topic: Differences between 1.5mm and 2.0mm  (Read 7004 times)

purple_buttefly

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Differences between 1.5mm and 2.0mm
« on: June 10, 2012, 04:24:53 PM »
Hi

Thinking of maybe switching from a 1.5mm to 2.0mm to treat my stretch marks, is this advisable as I've only just started rolling.

With a 2.0mm would the results come quicker or does it not make much difference? (I was wondering if clinics use the 2.0mm ones hence why they only seem to recommend 3 to 5 treatments)

SarahVaughter

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Differences between 1.5mm and 2.0mm
« Reply #1 on: June 14, 2012, 07:07:23 AM »
Stretch marks extend through the epidermis and reach the deep part of the dermis (called the reticular dermis). The thickness of the skin (epidermis + dermis) is not the same throughout the body. It varies, depending on the location on the body and it also varies individually. The thinnest skin is on the upper eyelids (ca. 0.5 mm), the thickest on the footsoles (ca. 4 mm). For the rest it is about 1.3 mm to 1.8 mm thick (the skin on the back can be 2 mm, especially in men).

Below the skin, there is a thick layer of fat, then muscle and then bone.

A 1.5 mm roller penetrates about 1.3 mm into the skin, which is very deep into the dermis and it is sufficient for stretch marks.

You can use a 2 mm dermaroller but it will be more painful and likely it will have no extra effect comparing to the 1.5 mm size. As a beginner, you should always start with shorter needles and when they get blunt, you can buy longer needles.

Currently, there is no method (including dermarolling) that can remove stretch marks. Currently, stretch marks can only be improved:

http://owndoc.com/dermarolling/dermarolling-microneedling-hype-realistic-results/

It is certainly realistic to get improvement in 3-5 treatments (with  >1 mm size) but it doesn't mean the stretch marks will be gone and it doesn't mean that everybody will get improvement after only 3-5 sessions. The clinics

just recommend 3-5 sessions and depending on the results, you will need more.

We have been always advocating to use the combination of a 1.5 mm roller + the single needles for stretch marks. The single needles penetrate deeper than a dermaroller and they can target the marks densely and individually.

Single needling is laborious but very effective in combination with dermarolling.
My comments should not be considered medical advice.

The dermaneedling part of our site is http://owndoc.com/dermarolling/

Our digital dermaneedling device ($170 for home users and clinics): http://derminator.com/

Derminator videos: https://www.youtube.com/user/owndoc/videos?flow=grid

purple_buttefly

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Differences between 1.5mm and 2.0mm
« Reply #2 on: June 14, 2012, 10:03:35 AM »
Thanks Sarah, your advice is always very helpful.

Is there any way to tell if needling has stopped working with stretch marks, for example I roll for the next 2 years and single needle once a month, would improvements be shown each time or can marks only be improved to a certain extent, therefore making later rolls ineffective?

SarahVaughter

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Differences between 1.5mm and 2.0mm
« Reply #3 on: June 17, 2012, 04:13:42 PM »
I am more or less addressing your question here:

   

  http://owndoc.com/dermarolling/dermarolling-microneedling-hype-realistic-results/
My comments should not be considered medical advice.

The dermaneedling part of our site is http://owndoc.com/dermarolling/

Our digital dermaneedling device ($170 for home users and clinics): http://derminator.com/

Derminator videos: https://www.youtube.com/user/owndoc/videos?flow=grid