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Author Topic: Dermarolling for thinning hair  (Read 30628 times)

SarahVaughter

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Dermarolling for thinning hair
« on: November 12, 2010, 06:32:28 PM »
>I understand that dermarolling can be effective
>for thinning hair. I have a 1.0 mm and 1.5
>dermaroller that I ordered from you this summer.
>I wondered if you could recommend the frequency
>of dermarolling on the scalp.

 

The most effective is to roll with a 0.2 or a 0.5 mm regular dermaroller (to enhance Minoxidil absorption) and apply Minoxidil right after dermarolling. Minoxidil doesn't grow new hair (such a miracle doesn’t exist yet) but it prolongs the growing phase of the hair. Hair cycles - it has active and dormant phases and by prolonging the growing phase, there will be more hair on your scalp.

 
 You have to be careful with Minoxidil. Please read this posting:

 http://forums.owndoc.com/dermarolling-microneedling/rolling-minoxidil-into-the-scalp/
 

Also, Minoxidil (especially the high percentages from 5%) sometimes/rarely thickens facial hair, which is not an appreciable effect when you are a woman however it is reversible and it will disappear if you discontinue Minoxidil. When you apply it, make sure it doesn't run down your face.

You should start with 2% Minoxidil and apply it with a 0.2 mm dermaroller every second day. If you have no problems, you can apply it every day. It will take several months to see the effects.


You can try to encourage hair growth by dermarolling itself, using a 0.5 or a 1 mm regular dermaroller (with or without Minoxidi)l. It will bring blood to the skin and thus nourishes the hair follicles.

 
The easiest way to roll the scalp is to roll in one direction only. Direction from the hair roots to the hair ends.

 
I think that the combination of Minoxidil with and dermaroller will be more successful than rolling without Minoxidil.

Please read:

A randomized evaluator blinded study of effect of microneedling in androgenetic alopecia: A pilot study

http://www.ijtrichology.com/article.asp?issn=0974-7753;year=2013;volume=5;issue=1;spage=6;epage=11;aulast=Dhurat



You may also be interested in this study about the effect of Ketoconazole on Androgenic Alopecia:

 
ketoconazole-hairloss.pdf
« Last Edit: July 25, 2013, 11:40:24 AM by SarahVaughter »
My comments should not be considered medical advice.

The dermaneedling part of our site is http://owndoc.com/dermarolling/

Our digital dermaneedling device ($170 for home users and clinics): http://derminator.com/

Derminator videos: https://www.youtube.com/user/owndoc/videos?flow=grid

Jacob01

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Dermarolling for thinning hair
« Reply #1 on: April 22, 2011, 09:11:26 AM »
Thank you for your advice and giving us the information about the causes of hair loss in a person. I am facing a problem of hair loss and I would surely try out the derma-roller procedure as I think it would be effective in preventing the hair from getting thin.

ranee13

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Dermarolling for thinning hair
« Reply #2 on: February 07, 2012, 07:28:25 PM »
Hi Sarah,

I am planning to purchase your 0.5mm roller for my husband as he has thinning hair. Could I just apply organic castor oil or coconut oil overnight after rolling? Based on your advise, we only roll in one direction - from root to hair end. How many times do I perform this for the same area? Also 8 to 10 times?

Thanks.

SarahVaughter

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Dermarolling for thinning hair
« Reply #3 on: February 08, 2012, 08:36:25 AM »
It is not necessary to apply any oils to the scalp. It will make your hair greasy.

   

  If anything, apply Minoxidil.

   

  Yes, 8-10 times is OK.
My comments should not be considered medical advice.

The dermaneedling part of our site is http://owndoc.com/dermarolling/

Our digital dermaneedling device ($170 for home users and clinics): http://derminator.com/

Derminator videos: https://www.youtube.com/user/owndoc/videos?flow=grid

ranee13

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Dermarolling for thinning hair
« Reply #4 on: February 08, 2012, 03:51:09 PM »
Hi Sarah,

Thanks and one last thing. How do I disinfect the scalp? Or just washing with shampoo before rolling is adequate?

Thanks again.

SarahVaughter

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Dermarolling for thinning hair
« Reply #5 on: February 11, 2012, 11:29:19 AM »
Yes, washing the hair regularly is enough. It is undoable to disinfect the scalp. You should however clean and disinfect the roller.


BTW If you would like to camouflage the balding patches, search the Internet for "hair replication artistry concepts". It is an interesting idea, indeed. It is mainly used by bold men but you could camouflage just balding patches in females as well.

 
If you can afford it, hair transplants of balding patches can also be done. They remove hair bulbs from the back of the head and transplant them to the front.

« Last Edit: December 13, 2012, 04:55:29 PM by SarahVaughter »
My comments should not be considered medical advice.

The dermaneedling part of our site is http://owndoc.com/dermarolling/

Our digital dermaneedling device ($170 for home users and clinics): http://derminator.com/

Derminator videos: https://www.youtube.com/user/owndoc/videos?flow=grid

Bubble

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Dermarolling for thinning hair
« Reply #6 on: May 23, 2012, 12:44:52 PM »
Dear Sarah

Thank you so much for your thoughtful and considered response and for this site, which I will be promoting .

I found the study on Ketoconazole extremely interesting , I like this sort research but it`s very difficult to find yourself sometimes.

I am hugely  reasured by you impartiality, integrity, knowledge and rationale.

Leading on from my initial enquiries , I read that people are also using propecia and S5 cream as well as taking biotin and using a laser comb.

Do you merit any of these in terms of efficacy and benefit verses risk.

Thank you again for all your work.

Bubble

SarahVaughter

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Dermarolling for thinning hair
« Reply #7 on: May 26, 2012, 05:01:07 PM »
I think Ketoconazole will only help if the hair loss is accompanied by seborrheic dermatitis of the scalp.

Propecia contains a substance called finasteride. The main contributor to male pattern baldness is not testosterone but dihydrotestosterone. Hair follicles contains the enzyme 5α-reductase that converts testosterone to dihydrotestosteron. Finasteeride inhibits this enzyme and thus blocks the conversion. The studies on Finasteride have been generally successful, although not in 100% of cases. It slowed down the progression of baldness and triggered some regrowth. Finasteride causes in some men reversible changes in their libido and sexual function. As you can see in the third study, 3.8% men on Finasteride experienced these side effects comparing to 2.1% men on a placebo. If you decide to try it, look for Finasteride.

Finasteride in the treatment of men with androgenetic alopecia

Background:

Androgenetic alopecia (male pattern hair loss) is caused by androgen-dependent miniaturization of scalp hair follicles, with scalp dihydrotestosterone (DHT) implicated as a contributing cause. Finasteride, an inhibitor of type II 5α-reductase, decreases serum and scalp DHT by inhibiting conversion of testosterone to DHT. Objective: Our purpose was to determine whether finasteride treatment leads to clinical improvement in men with male pattern hair loss.

Methods:

In two 1-year trials, 1553 men (18 to 41 years of age) with male pattern hair loss received oral finasteride 1 mg/d or placebo, and 1215 men continued in blinded extension studies for a second year. Efficacy was evaluated by scalp hair counts, patient and investigator assessments, and review of photographs by an expert panel.

Results:

Finasteride treatment improved scalp hair by all evaluation techniques at 1 and 2 years (P < .001 vs placebo, all comparisons). Clinically significant increases in hair count (baseline = 876 hairs), measured in a 1-inch diameter circular area (5.1 cm2 ) of balding vertex scalp, were observed with finasteride treatment (107 and 138 hairs vs placebo at 1 and 2 years, respectively; P < .001). Treatment with placebo resulted in progressive hair loss. Patients’ self-assessment demonstrated that finasteride treatment slowed hair loss, increased hair growth, and improved appearance of hair. These improvements were corroborated by investigator assessments and assessments of photographs. Adverse effects were minimal.

Conclusion:

In men with male pattern hair loss, finasteride 1 mg/d slowed the progression of hair loss and increased hair growth in clinical trials over 2 years. (J Am Acad Dermatol 1998;39:578-89.)

Clinical dose ranging studies with finasteride, a type 2 5α-reductase inhibitor, in men with male pattern hair loss * *

Background:


Androgenetic alopecia is a common condition of adult men. Finasteride, a type 2 5α-reductase inhibitor, decreases the formation of dihydrotestosterone from testosterone.

Objective:

Two separate clinical studies were conducted to establish the optimal dose of finasteride in men with this condition.

Methods:

Men from 18 to 36 years of age with moderate vertex male pattern hair loss received finasteride 5, 1, 0.2, or 0.01 mg/day or placebo based on random assignment. Efficacy was determined by scalp hair counts, patient self-assessment, investigator assessment, and assessment of clinical photographs. Safety was assessed by clinical and laboratory measurements and by analysis of adverse experiences.

Results:

Efficacy was demonstrated for all end points for finasteride at doses of 0.2 mg/day or higher, with 1 and 5 mg demonstrating similar efficacy that was superior to lower doses. Efficacy of the 0.01 mg dose was similar to placebo. No significant safety issues were identified in the trials.

Conclusion:

Finasteride 1 mg/day is the optimal dose for the treatment of men with male pattern hair loss and was subsequently identified for further clinical development.

(The reported clinical studies were entirely supported by Merck Research Laboratories, Merck & Co, Inc. Merck & Co, Inc is the company that manufactures and markets finasteride.)



Finasteride: A Review of its Use in Male Pattern Hair Loss


The 5 -reductase inhibitor finasteride blocks the conversion of testosterone to dihydrotestosterone (DHT), the androgen responsible for male pattern hair loss (androgenetic alopecia) in genetically predisposed men.

Results of phase III clinical studies in 1879 men have shown that oral finasteride 1 mg/day promotes hair growth and prevents further hair loss in a significant proportion of men with male pattern hair loss. Evidence suggests that the improvement in hair count reported after 1 year is maintained during 2 years' treatment. In men with vertex hair loss, global photographs showed improvement in hair growth in 48% of finasteride recipients at 1 year and in 66% at 2 years compared with 7% of placebo recipients at each time point. Furthermore, hair counts in these men showed that 83% of finasteride versus 28% of placebo recipients had no further hair loss compared with baseline after 2 years.

The clinical efficacy of oral finasteride has not yet been compared with that of topical minoxidil, the only other drug used clinically in patients with male pattern hair loss.

Therapeutic dosages of finasteride are generally well tolerated. In phase III studies, 7.7% of patients receiving finasteride 1 mg/day compared with 7.0% of those receiving placebo reported treatment-related adverse events. The overall incidence of sexual function disorders, comprising decreased libido, ejaculation disorder and erectile dysfunction, was significantly greater in finasteride than placebo recipients (3.8 vs 2.1%). All sexual adverse events were reversed on discontinuation of therapy and many resolved in patients who continued therapy. No other drug-related events were reported with an incidence  1% in patients receiving finasteride. Most events were of mild to moderate severity.

Oral finasteride is contraindicated in pregnant women because of the risk of hypospadias in male fetuses.

Conclusions:

Oral finasteride promotes scalp hair growth and prevents further hair loss in a significant proportion of men with male pattern hair loss. With its generally good tolerability profile, finasteride is a new approach to the management of this condition, for which treatment options are few. Its role relative to topical minoxidil has yet to be determined.
My comments should not be considered medical advice.

The dermaneedling part of our site is http://owndoc.com/dermarolling/

Our digital dermaneedling device ($170 for home users and clinics): http://derminator.com/

Derminator videos: https://www.youtube.com/user/owndoc/videos?flow=grid

Bubble

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Dermarolling for thinning hair
« Reply #8 on: May 28, 2012, 01:54:54 PM »
Thank you so much for your response and all the science:eureka:

I would hate to trespass on your time since this is not directly related to the business of your site but what do you think of this : Science or Marketing ?!

[link removed]




SarahVaughter

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Dermarolling for thinning hair
« Reply #9 on: May 30, 2012, 01:58:47 PM »
Spironolactone has been used orally as an anti-androgen in gyneacology and other fields for a long time so it is certainly a genuine approach to hair loss. Topical application of spironolactone will have less side effects but I cannot comment on how effective the topical application is. It is certainly worth trying, just like Finasteride. Male pattern baldness is hormonally induced and you will hardly win the battle against hair loss without targeting the hormonal aspect of it.

   

  Dermarolling cannot affect hormones. It can enhance the penetration of hair loss products and it will increase blood flow to the hair follicles.
My comments should not be considered medical advice.

The dermaneedling part of our site is http://owndoc.com/dermarolling/

Our digital dermaneedling device ($170 for home users and clinics): http://derminator.com/

Derminator videos: https://www.youtube.com/user/owndoc/videos?flow=grid

Bubble

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Dermarolling for thinning hair
« Reply #10 on: May 30, 2012, 06:14:05 PM »
Thanks againfor your guidance through a very thorny wood,  really encouraged by your responses, given me a good copass bearing from a source with no vested interest in selling me anything...

Hugely apprecaited

msbettyboop

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Dermarolling for thinning hair
« Reply #11 on: June 19, 2012, 05:35:23 AM »
I am just reading through this very informative site and forum and I'm really happy I found it. I have a question please. I will be rolling without anything but after rolling, won't the pores be open up to receive something so to speak. Don't I need to massage anything into it? If I choose not to massage anything into the open pores, is there a possibility of infection or something? The area isn't bald, just slight thinning. TIA.

SarahVaughter

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Re: Dermarolling for thinning hair
« Reply #12 on: June 24, 2012, 05:44:08 PM »
Dermarolling is a relatively new method and it is not yet fully medically understood. Dermarolling brings more blood to the hair follicles and that is certainly beneficial and there may be some other positive effects on the hair follicles by dermarolling but at the moment, there is not enough data to claim with certainty that dermarolling by itself will promote hair growth. It is worth trying but there is no guarantee.

That is why we have been recommending using a 0.2 or a 0.5 mm regular dermaroller to enhance the penetration of Minoxidil. Minoxidil does not trigger new hair follicles - it just prolongs the growing phase of the existing ones and thus makes the hair appear thicker. It does not work for everybody but in many cases it works.

The skin "microchannels" caused by dermarolling are relatively quickly closed. None of our customers has ever reported an infection, neither does one hear about dermarolling infections online much, if at all, in spite ofthe fact that tens of thousands of people are dermarolling. Just we alone have tens of thousands of customers.

Actually, we have one customer who has reported something that could have perhaps been a mild infection. She needled acne scars on both of her cheeks that had some residual acne spots. One of her cheeks became quite red a day after needling and some of the acne spots became purulent. The other cheek was fine. The problem quickly subsided and everything was OK. It was not her first needling session. It is difficult to say whether it was an infection or the residual acne just flared as a reaction to dermarolling.

Always clean the dermaneedling instrument after dermarolling with dishwashing detergent and warm water and rinse it under a strong stream of water to remove blood and skin debris from the needles.

My comments should not be considered medical advice.

The dermaneedling part of our site is http://owndoc.com/dermarolling/

Our digital dermaneedling device ($170 for home users and clinics): http://derminator.com/

Derminator videos: https://www.youtube.com/user/owndoc/videos?flow=grid

msbettyboop

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Re: Dermarolling for thinning hair
« Reply #13 on: July 03, 2012, 04:18:07 AM »
Thank you for that comprehensive response Sarah! Now I'm better informed on dermarolling the scalp.

cj123

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Re: Dermarolling for thinning hair
« Reply #14 on: July 04, 2012, 11:23:25 PM »
An easy way to get the blood flowing into the scalp without need of gadgets is to simply bend over at the waist and hang your head slightly down. Use the palms of your hands to gently manipulate the scalp without pulling the hair. I do this for about three minutes every night before going to bed.

This really gets the blood flowing into your head (and all the nutrients in the bloodstream). Doing this also loosens a tight scalp and feels really good.
« Last Edit: July 04, 2012, 11:25:00 PM by cj123 »