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Author Topic: derma stamp  (Read 21956 times)

SarahVaughter

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« Reply #15 on: January 03, 2011, 09:56:04 AM »
Pinpoint bleeding. Meaning a tiny bead of blood, pumped out in the fraction of a second it takes for the micro-hole to close again. So the skin laceration takes time to heal, but the actual hole itself closes immediately, as if you had put a stick in viscous mud and pulled it out again. Microneedling is not like coring an apple, it is more like sticking a needle into rubber (elastin..)

The reason you'll get more product penetration on dermarolled skin is mostly due to capillary action and suction. Rubbing products into dermarolled skin causes lateral friction in the microchannels, so by capillary action and suction, the product slowly gets absorbed, aided by increased blood flow. After rolling, you do not have a lot of 0.25 mm wide holes in your skin.
My comments should not be considered medical advice.

The dermaneedling part of our site is http://owndoc.com/dermarolling/

Our digital dermaneedling device ($170 for home users and clinics): http://derminator.com/

Derminator videos: https://www.youtube.com/user/owndoc/videos?flow=grid

skinny

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« Reply #16 on: January 03, 2011, 04:27:02 PM »
thank you for quick response and the videos.

i also wanted to ask your opinion if it is worth trying dermastamp to correct the depressed scar on the tip of the nose because of the thin skin there and underlying cartilage. have done this scar minimally with single needle once, however unsure if anything have changed for better.

kakalakingma

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« Reply #17 on: January 03, 2011, 11:13:53 PM »
skinny;1051 wrote: thank you for quick response and the videos.

i also wanted to ask your opinion if it is worth trying dermastamp to correct the depressed scar on the tip of the nose because of the thin skin there and underlying cartilage. have done this scar minimally with single needle once, however unsure if anything have changed for better.

 

Hi skinny,

    I think you are better off with single needling for specific spots like "depressed scar on the tip of the nose". Sarah sell single needles on her shop! Make sure you have a skin care regimen to do maintanence and boosting on collagen production. This includes hydroxy acids,  copper peptides, tretinoin, optionally vitamin C, and sunscreen. I think the stamp is better off if you choose to treat a larger surface area. The nose is all contoured and stuff and I thinkk single needle is better.

[Update: here is a

FINLEY

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« Reply #18 on: January 04, 2011, 02:58:03 PM »
Is it okay to use the stamp on a box car scar that is slightly smaller in diameter than the stamp- will I damage the adjacent skin???  I plan to use the 1.5 mm stamp on targeted areas which include a box car scar and a few depressed scars, and then do a rolling with a 2 mm roller on my entire face.   Will this be safe and wise?   Thanks in advance.

SarahVaughter

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« Reply #19 on: January 04, 2011, 05:30:37 PM »
No problem using a dermastamp. Just don't completely mash the skin. (You can needle extremely densely with the single needle because you can target the scar only). With a derma stamp the surrounding skin is going to be hit so do not totally mash it.

     

  It might be quite painful to roll with a 2 mm roller onto the areas that have just been stamped. But if you can handle it, do it. Otherwise do it the other way round, first roll, then stamp. Or first roll and stamp a day or several days later.
My comments should not be considered medical advice.

The dermaneedling part of our site is http://owndoc.com/dermarolling/

Our digital dermaneedling device ($170 for home users and clinics): http://derminator.com/

Derminator videos: https://www.youtube.com/user/owndoc/videos?flow=grid

kakalakingma

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« Reply #20 on: January 18, 2011, 10:42:32 PM »
SarahVaughter;1047 wrote: Pinpoint bleeding. Meaning a tiny bead of blood, pumped out in the fraction of a second it takes for the micro-hole to close again. So the skin laceration takes time to heal, but the actual hole itself closes immediately, as if you had put a stick in viscous mud and pulled it out again. Microneedling is not like coring an apple, it is more like sticking a needle into rubber (elastin..)

The reason you'll get more product penetration on dermarolled skin is mostly due to capillary action and suction. Rubbing products into dermarolled skin causes lateral friction in the microchannels, so by capillary action and suction, the product slowly gets absorbed, aided by increased blood flow. After rolling, you do not have a lot of 0.25 mm wide holes in your skin.

 

Hi Sarah,

    I was just rereading this posts of this thread and I am particularly intereseted to know more in this post of yours, especially the second part (bolded). What is exactly is causing the "suction"? When you say "capillary action", are you referring to the acute inflammation (hence incereased blood flow) caused by microneedling? Another thing, does the suctioning and capillary effects continues even after the holes are closed immediately (with 0.25mm)? I did a Google search on "lateral friction" and it give me Physics stuff that I cannot (quite) understand. So, what does that mean in terms of skin damage? I just like to know the mechanism or biology when it comes to skin needling. I like to know the specifics if you can provide it for me.

Thanks in advance!

SarahVaughter

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« Reply #21 on: January 19, 2011, 07:03:02 AM »
I was referring to Capillarity (having nothing to do with capillary veins or inflammation).

When you pierce the skin and make a micro-hole, you have created a thin, narrow, long  tube.

Because when we say that the hole "closes", we don't mean that it closes in the horizontal plane. It closes in the vertical plane. That the skin "closes" means not that some kind of crust forms on top, but that the sides of the micro-channel move towards eachother, so that there is no 0.25 mm wide "air hole" in the skin. That happens immediately after rollign due to water cohesion and the surrounding tissue pressure.

A "closed" microchannel resulting from rolling with a 1 mm dermaroller can be regarded as a capillary tube with a depth of around 0.7 mm and a width of extremely much less than the original 0.25 mm needle diameter that was used to create that hole. From microneedled skin micrographs (microscopy photo's) we can see that those "closed" microchannels are but a few skin cell diameters wide, at most. And they are not filled with air, but due to capillary action (adhesion) filled with tissue fluids.

Of course those tissue fluids, because they have direct access to the skin surface (they reside in a pierced hole) evaporate continuously, and lateral friction in the moving skin also causes those fluids to be partially expelled from the "hole", aiding their evaporation.

Replensihment of those fluids happens with more tissue fluids, but also with externally applied skin products, due to capillary effects and lateral friction causing a suction effect (on a molecular level, whereby adhesion and cohesion forces play major roles).
My comments should not be considered medical advice.

The dermaneedling part of our site is http://owndoc.com/dermarolling/

Our digital dermaneedling device ($170 for home users and clinics): http://derminator.com/

Derminator videos: https://www.youtube.com/user/owndoc/videos?flow=grid

kakalakingma

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« Reply #22 on: January 19, 2011, 02:12:10 PM »
This is great information. Thanks for the wiki link; I just didn't read the math part, lol. I think I need a little bit more clarification. So capillary action pushes the tissue fluid to the surface and it evaporates, but how can that enhances penetration when "suctioning" is supposed to draw the product ingredients, say vit. C, into the skin? Seems like fighting forces to me... am I misunderstanding something? The lateral friction caused rubbing sounds more like "massaging in", "pressing in" or "pushing in" the ingrediens rather than suctioning.... right? I mean, if there are fluids being lifted by capillary action, does that not impair the absorption of ingredients?

This is what wikipedia states:

"Capillary action, or capillarity, is a phenomenon where liquid spontaneously rises in a narrow space such as a thin tube, or in porous materials such as paper or in some non-porous materials such as liquified carbon fibre. This effect can cause liquids to flow against the force of gravity or the magnetic field induction. It occurs because of inter-molecular attractive forces between the liquid and solid surrounding surfaces; If the diameter of the tube is sufficiently small, then the combination of surface tension (which is caused by cohesion within the liquid) and forces of adhesion between the liquid and container act to lift the liquid."