Derminator



Please only post questions when you could not find the answer searching this forum or our instructions. Pre-and post-sales questions about our products only. Thank you!

Author Topic: derma stamp  (Read 22320 times)

Katarina

  • Guest
derma stamp
« on: June 21, 2010, 06:33:43 PM »
What are your thought's about this item?

SarahVaughter

  • www.owndoc.com
  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 2275
  • Medical journalist
derma stamp
« Reply #1 on: June 23, 2010, 09:22:17 AM »
It is useful for acne scars. We plan to sell them in the future. A dermaroller will do the same job though. The most targeted scar treatment is the single needle, allowing you to approach the scar from different angles and using different needling densities. Single-needling requires lots of patience.
My comments should not be considered medical advice.

The dermaneedling part of our site is http://owndoc.com/dermarolling/

Our digital dermaneedling device ($170 for home users and clinics): http://derminator.com/

Derminator videos: https://www.youtube.com/user/owndoc/videos?flow=grid

skinny

  • Guest
derma stamp
« Reply #2 on: August 19, 2010, 12:28:58 PM »
How soon do you plan start selling DermaStamp?

Thanks!

SarahVaughter

  • www.owndoc.com
  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 2275
  • Medical journalist
derma stamp
« Reply #3 on: August 19, 2010, 05:34:35 PM »
The beginning of winter.
My comments should not be considered medical advice.

The dermaneedling part of our site is http://owndoc.com/dermarolling/

Our digital dermaneedling device ($170 for home users and clinics): http://derminator.com/

Derminator videos: https://www.youtube.com/user/owndoc/videos?flow=grid

SarahVaughter

  • www.owndoc.com
  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 2275
  • Medical journalist
derma stamp
« Reply #4 on: November 25, 2010, 04:13:05 PM »
We now have it in store! :-)

Indeed an excellent tool to treat more serious acne scars on the face.

Buy dermastamp for acne scars
My comments should not be considered medical advice.

The dermaneedling part of our site is http://owndoc.com/dermarolling/

Our digital dermaneedling device ($170 for home users and clinics): http://derminator.com/

Derminator videos: https://www.youtube.com/user/owndoc/videos?flow=grid

SarahVaughter

  • www.owndoc.com
  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 2275
  • Medical journalist
derma stamp
« Reply #5 on: December 02, 2010, 07:13:08 AM »
After having been asked repeatedly to start selling dermastamps, we offer the dermastamp specifically for those who do not want to use a dermaroller on larger areas of facial skin but just want to treat a local area with acne scars or wide stretch marks. When they have too many scars to do it efficiently by single needling, a dermastamp fills the niche between single needle and dermaroller. You can of course treat localized acne scar areas with a dermaroller as well but for some people a dermastamp might be easier to maneuver.

To sum it up, a dermastamp is ideal when the surface area to treat is a bit too large for a single needle, and a bit too small for a dermaroller. Rolling inevitably results in an elongated treatment area. Stamping treats only a small cirle.  You can treat irregular areas of acne scars easier with a dermastamp in some cases.

It's all about efficiently targeting the exact area you want to treat.

As to your remark on "copycat devices" and your hope about what we sell in our shop - Analizing your previous postings here and that peculiar remark, could you reveal what your stake is in this issue? Are you a co-inventor of the Dermaroller? Are you a microneedling practitioner?
My comments should not be considered medical advice.

The dermaneedling part of our site is http://owndoc.com/dermarolling/

Our digital dermaneedling device ($170 for home users and clinics): http://derminator.com/

Derminator videos: https://www.youtube.com/user/owndoc/videos?flow=grid

kakalakingma

  • Guest
derma stamp
« Reply #6 on: December 02, 2010, 07:58:11 PM »
Hi Sarah,

    I sincerely apologize if I made any comments that may have implied any negativity to your business. Let me make it clear that I am NOT a co-inventor of the Dermaroller or a microneedling practioner. I am just like any consumer who likes to do research on the derma roller and is inquisitive on its abilities to potentially remodel the skin in conjuction with the right skin care routine (e.g., Vitamin A & C + GHK-Cu + sun protection). I have recently purchased your 1.5 mm derma roller along with the EMLA cream. I am planning to start my derma rolling diary later this december with progress pictures. I may or may not post them up here. I think your website is fantastic that it sells affordable derma roller and skin care products AND reasonable intructions. I was just curious as to why it was necessary to add the derma stamp when the derma roller can provide the same results. That is where I assume the derma stamp acts as the "copycat" so to speak. I guess I find it much more preferred, for me, to use the derma roller instead of the derma stamp because it is more versatile. You can treat localized scar as well as larger skin areas with a smooth stroke of the roller. I do not mean to apply my view on this to every consumer. I came to realize that it all comes down to personal preference on how they like to hold the device and how they prefer to manuvere the needles (rolling vs stamping). Here is how I personally assess the pros/cons of each device:

Single Needle: effective at treating white stretch marks and scars but can be a tedious task when use over a large area of skin. Manuever the device by manually pricking the skin one at a time

Derma Stamp: effective at treating a variety of skin issues such as acne scars, skin discoloration, skin texture, and wrinkles on a localized skin area conveinently. Manuever the device by manually stamping a specific area of skin one at a time.

Derma roller: effective at treatment a variety of skin issues such as acne scars, skin discoloration, skin texture, and wrinkles on a localized AND elongated  conveinently. Manuever the devic by manually rolling a specific or larger area of skin. Also, you get to roll left to right, up and down, and diagonally in an even manner. It may take some time to acquire the skill to control how much skin you want to prick with the roller.  

Again, I am sorry that if you find my statement peculiar. It was not intended to be so. I mean no disrespect. :D

[Update: and about the whole store comment, I just think there are so many online shops these days that sell a lot of filler products, many of which work the same as each other. True, it can come down to personal preference. But it can also come down to: if there is a best, then use the best. If there is the cheapest, then sell the cheapest. Something like that.]

SarahVaughter

  • www.owndoc.com
  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 2275
  • Medical journalist
derma stamp
« Reply #7 on: December 03, 2010, 03:00:49 AM »
It may be of interest that in fact the dermaroller is the "copycat" device.. The dermastamp was invented first, because it was the simplest method of mass-needling. The dermastamp is still going strong, existing in a variety of sizes, up to sizes that make "stamping" large areas of skin faster than "rolling".

The main thing is that one should use the best tool for the job, and there is a place for the dermastamp. We only sell it in the 1.5 mm version because treating acne scars with a shorter length is sub-optimal. So we're not looking just to fill up our store with all kinds of stuff. It took one year before we became convinced that there was a genuine utilization for it. Then we immediately proceeded to add it, because we like to be complete.

The same with Retinoic acid, that we recently added. We used to only offer a form of vit. A best suitable for after-care. But there also is the case of vit. A pre-care. Retinoic acid in a cream is better than Retinol acetate in an ointment for that purpose, and vice versa, Retinol acetate in an ointment is much better for post-needling than Retinoic acid.

But because we started small (with just 1.5 mm rollers) it takes time to expand, as we have to pay many thousands of dollars in advance for each product we add to our store.. We will add a few more products in the future, based on what we read in the scientific literature. Hyaluronic acid is interesting, for example. So far, we haven't been able to find a good quality, reasonable-priced Hyaluronic acid product suitable for microneedling.
My comments should not be considered medical advice.

The dermaneedling part of our site is http://owndoc.com/dermarolling/

Our digital dermaneedling device ($170 for home users and clinics): http://derminator.com/

Derminator videos: https://www.youtube.com/user/owndoc/videos?flow=grid

kakalakingma

  • Guest
derma stamp
« Reply #8 on: December 03, 2010, 03:59:20 AM »
Ah! Is that so? The derma stamp came first? Well, my apology, again. I will retract my comment about the "copycat". Thanks for the insight.

PS: you should make a thread about the research you have found regarding the use of hyaluronic acid and its relationship/benefit with wound healing or derma rolling. I think that would be fabolous.

skinny

  • Guest
derma stamp
« Reply #9 on: January 02, 2011, 11:04:46 PM »
when using dermastamp, is it sufficient to press just once per scar (if the d of stamp is enough to cover it) or several times, as recommended when using roller :confused:

thank you

kakalakingma

  • Guest
derma stamp
« Reply #10 on: January 03, 2011, 12:21:14 AM »
Hi Skinny,

     I have found two You Tube video that showcase derma stamp demonstration.

[video=youtube;kGlUMFMEeOs]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kGlUMFMEeOs[/video]

[video=youtube;lDjUqE5Cy-c]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lDjUqE5Cy-c&feature=related[/video]

I only saw snippets of the videos. I think you can go over the same area over again. But I don't think you get the benefit of derma roller because you can roll diagnoally and up and down and left and right. I hope the video helps

best wishes

SarahVaughter

  • www.owndoc.com
  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 2275
  • Medical journalist
derma stamp
« Reply #11 on: January 03, 2011, 06:28:31 AM »
If you stamp skin without scars - for skin rejuvenation - then a single press is more or less sufficient. If you press on scars, wrinkles or stretch marks then multiple presses "stamps" are advisable. Our dermastamp has 35 needles and covers an area of approx 1 cm2 approximately. If you stamp three times, you will get 105 pricks per cm2. Do not stamp three times on exactly the same spot but very slightly move/rotate the stamp with each stamping to ensure you don't stamp into the same holes.
My comments should not be considered medical advice.

The dermaneedling part of our site is http://owndoc.com/dermarolling/

Our digital dermaneedling device ($170 for home users and clinics): http://derminator.com/

Derminator videos: https://www.youtube.com/user/owndoc/videos?flow=grid

kakalakingma

  • Guest
derma stamp
« Reply #12 on: January 03, 2011, 06:32:52 AM »
How far away are the needles apart? I mean, if they are very close, I think people need to practice to be skillfull at "very slightly move/rotate the stamp". Could be tough for some.

SarahVaughter

  • www.owndoc.com
  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 2275
  • Medical journalist
derma stamp
« Reply #13 on: January 03, 2011, 07:17:32 AM »
They are about 1 mm apart. In fact, the advice to stamp a slightly different spot is superfluous, as the inherent randomness of the action ensures a high statistical probability that the needles don't go into the exact same spot (the skin holes close immediately - before the next stamping). I quoted from the manufacturers' instructions but there is no way you could prick the exact same spot accurate by a 0.01 mm twice in a row - it would be nearly impossible even if you tried to do it on purpose.
My comments should not be considered medical advice.

The dermaneedling part of our site is http://owndoc.com/dermarolling/

Our digital dermaneedling device ($170 for home users and clinics): http://derminator.com/

Derminator videos: https://www.youtube.com/user/owndoc/videos?flow=grid

kakalakingma

  • Guest
derma stamp
« Reply #14 on: January 03, 2011, 07:57:19 AM »
Great insight from the manufacturer-kudos!

Um... when you say the holes close immediately, would that be a separate thing from having pin point bleeding? I mean, I am thinking that if the holes closed that quickly, then there shouldn't be any blood and just redness?