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Author Topic: Copper peptides  (Read 36604 times)

SarahVaughter

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Copper peptides
« on: May 05, 2010, 06:40:17 AM »
I re-post the essence here after erroneously having deleted the entire thread:

We have received the copper peptide facial masks. They are non-comedogenic.

We sell the GHK-Cu facial masks for just 3 dollars, and they are excellent after dermarolling the face with needles of any length.  The facial mask is applied after dermarolling. When your face has dried, you can apply Infadolan ointment to selected spots.  Our masks contain 2000 ppm GHK-Cu/a>. [url=http://www.owndoc.com/dermarolling/copper-peptides-for-dermarolling/]GHK-Cu is the best copper peptide for skin rejuvenation and collagen regeneration.

Buy our copper peptide facial mask

<strong>Ingredient list:</strong>

          Carbomer (Carboxypolymethylene) 10 %

          TEA (Triethanol amine) 0.1 %

          Hyaluronic Acid 0.3 %

          GHK-Cu 0.1 % (1000 ppm)

          Nano Platinum 0.1 %

          Centella Extract 2 %

          Yam Extract 2 %

          Syn-Coll (PALMITOYL TRIPEPTIDE-3) 2 %

          Vitamin B3 0.2 %

          Vitamin B5 0.3 %

          1,3 Butylene Glycol 5 %

          Propylene Glycol 3 %

          Propyl paraben 0.1 %

          Tween 20 0.1 %

          Fragrance 0.01 %

          The rest is deionized water.

  It is found that in poor connective tissue conditions, the triterpenes in<strong> Centella asiatica</strong> are able to renew the collagen, in quantity and quality, and restore tissue firmness and skin elasticity, improving skin appearance and comfort. Apart from this it also has anti-psoriatic properties.

          (Reference Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, May-June 2000, pages 227-234;

          Phytomedicine, May 2001, pages 230-235; and Contact Dermatitis, October 1993, pages 175-179)

          <strong>Pantothenic acid, also called vitamin B5</strong>

          Wound Healing

          A study in 1999 showed that pantothenic acid has an effect on wound healing

          in vitro[51]. Wiemann and Hermann found that cell cultures with a

          concentration of 100μg/mL calcium D-pantothenate increased migration, and

          the fibres ran directionally with several layers, whereas the cell cultures

          without pantothenic acid healed in no orderly motion, and with fewer

          layers[52]. Cell proliferation, or cell multiplication was found to increase

          with pantothenic acid supplementation[53]. Finally, there were increased

          concentrations of two proteins, both of which have still to be been

          identified, that was found in the supplemented culture, but not on the

          control[54]. Further studies are needed to determine whether these effects

          will stand in vivo.

          <strong>Acne</strong>

          Following from discoveries in mouse trials, in the late 1990s a small study

          was published promoting the use of pantothenic acid to treat acne vulgaris.

          According to a study published in 1995 by Dr. Lit-Hung Leung,[62] high doses

          of Vitamin B5 resolved acne and decreased pore size. Dr. Leung also proposes

          a mechanism, stating that CoA regulates both hormones and fatty-acids, and

          without sufficient quantities of pantothenic acid, CoA will preferentially

          produce androgens. This causes fatty acids to build up and be excreted

          through sebaceous glands, causing acne. Leung's study gave 45 Asian males

          and 55 Asian females varying doses of 10-20g of pantothenic acid (100000% of

          the US Daily Value), 80% orally and 20% through topical cream. Leung noted

          improvement of acne within one week to one month of the start of the

          treatment.

          http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pantothenic_acid

          <strong>Topical Use of Dexpanthenol in Skin Disorders</strong>

          Authors: Ebner F.1; Heller A.2; Rippke F.2; Tausch I.3

          Source: American Journal of Clinical Dermatology, Volume 3, Number 6, 1 June

          2002 , pp. 427-433(7)

          Publisher: Adis International

          Abstract:

          Pantothenic acid is essential to normal epithelial function. It is a

          component of coenzyme A, which serves as a cofactor for a variety of

          enzyme-catalyzed reactions that are important in the metabolism of

          carbohydrates, fatty acids, proteins, gluconeogenesis, sterols, steroid

          hormones, and porphyrins. The topical use of dexpanthenol, the stable

          alcoholic analog of pantothenic acid, is based on good skin penetration and

          high local concentrations of dexpanthenol when administered in an adequate

          vehicle, such as water-in-oil emulsions. Topical dexpanthenol acts like a

          moisturizer, improving stratum corneum hydration, reducing

          transepidermal water loss and maintaining skin softness and elasticity.

          Activation of fibroblast proliferation, which is of relevance in wound healing, has been

          observed both in vitro and in vivo with dexpanthenol. Accelerated

          re-epithelization in wound healing, monitored by means of the transepidermal

          water loss as an indicator of the intact epidermal barrier function, has

          also been seen. Dexpanthenol has been shown to have an anti-inflammatory

          effect on experimental ultraviolet-induced erythema.

          Beneficial effects of dexpanthenol have been observed in patients who have

          undergone skin transplantation or scar treatment, or therapy for burn

          injuries and different dermatoses. The stimulation of epithelization,

          granulation and mitigation of itching were the most prominent effects of

          formulations containing dexpanthenol. In double-blind placebo-controlled

          clinical trials, dexpanthenol was evaluated for its efficacy in improving

          wound healing. Epidermal wounds treated with dexpanthenol emulsion showed a

          reduction in erythema, and more elastic and solid tissue regeneration.

          Monitoring of transepidermal water loss showed a significant acceleration of

          epidermal regeneration as a result of dexpanthenol therapy, as compared with

          the vehicle. In an irritation model, pretreatment with dexpanthenol cream

          resulted in significantly less damage to the stratum corneum barrier,

          compared with no pretreatment. Adjuvant skin care with dexpanthenol

          considerably improved the symptoms of skin irritation, such as dryness of

          the skin, roughness, scaling, pruritus, erythema, erosion/fissures, over 3

          to 4 weeks. Usually, the topical administration of dexpanthenol preparations

          is well tolerated, with minimal risk of skin irritancy or sensitization.
« Last Edit: January 30, 2014, 07:35:23 AM by SarahVaughter »
I am not a medical doctor and my comments should not be considered medical advice.

The dermaneedling part of our site is http://owndoc.com/category/dermarolling/

emily100

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Copper peptides
« Reply #1 on: May 16, 2010, 09:19:33 PM »
How often should I use these? I know it says "after dermarolling" but does this mean after ANY dermarolling (.25 needles) or just the main dermarolling session with the longer needles?  Can I use it too much or to a point where there really is no benefit to using it more? Thanks!

SarahVaughter

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Copper peptides
« Reply #2 on: May 17, 2010, 04:32:25 AM »
I'd use a mask once a week, but I advise trying it first after dermarolling with 0.25 mm needles first, because the concentration of peptides is high in our facial mask and redness is to be expected. I'll add this to the instructions.
I am not a medical doctor and my comments should not be considered medical advice.

The dermaneedling part of our site is http://owndoc.com/category/dermarolling/

Katarina

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Copper peptides
« Reply #3 on: June 21, 2010, 07:34:20 PM »
can the CP mask be used with any reasonable results if I don't dermaroll?

emily100

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Copper peptides
« Reply #4 on: June 22, 2010, 11:38:09 PM »
Sarah,

I received my Cu peptide masks. Thank you! Ok,  I think I have a dumb question so please bear with me.... :( Sorry!

Ok, there are two mask layers within the packaging.  I only put on one, right?  The real "plastic-y" layer --- is it used for anything besides getting off the copper peptides and putting that lotion elsewhere on my body.......or am I to be placing the plastic mask layer over the softer layer mask part?  I have a feeling I might have done it wrong.....

Thank you!!!

SarahVaughter

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Copper peptides
« Reply #5 on: June 23, 2010, 02:33:51 AM »
You should keep that plastic part attached, it should be on the outside - it is "occluding", it prevents the evaporation of the copper peptide lotion and increases its absorbtion.
I am not a medical doctor and my comments should not be considered medical advice.

The dermaneedling part of our site is http://owndoc.com/category/dermarolling/

SarahVaughter

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Copper peptides
« Reply #6 on: June 23, 2010, 09:13:14 AM »
Any cream or mask can be used without dermarolling. The penetration of the product is highly enhanced by dermarolling. The copper peptide masks were designed to be used without dermarolling and the concentration of copper peptides is very high at 2000 ppm. So yes, you will benefit also without rolling.

  However it is impossible to predict the results - you have to try it. You could use one mask a week for a while.
I am not a medical doctor and my comments should not be considered medical advice.

The dermaneedling part of our site is http://owndoc.com/category/dermarolling/

emily100

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Copper peptides
« Reply #7 on: June 24, 2010, 11:53:59 PM »
Thanks Sarah!! Oh gosh. I was doing it wrong. Oh well. Glad I clarified now!  Thank you for getting back to me!

kakalakingma

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Copper peptides
« Reply #8 on: July 24, 2010, 12:16:17 AM »
Hi Sarah,

    Do you think you can ask the manufacturer to remove the fragrance out of the mask in the future. I think that will do a world of good for (very) sensitive skin-type people who already has to endure the pricking of needles, I just don't think they need fragrance to sting them right after. Fragrance is not needed to remodel the skin, right? If it does sting, it will further induce unnecessary inflammation. Plus, this product is in a cloth-mask form, so it is drench with it and you are directed to leave it on the face for a few minutes. This is my request and I wish you consider this.

SarahVaughter

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Copper peptides
« Reply #9 on: July 25, 2010, 05:56:55 PM »
Sure, but it's not the fragrance that stings, (it's only 0.01% fragrance anyway, John says even 0.01% battery acid would not sting), it's the copper peptides themselves that can irritate the skin. They are known to do that even on non-dermarolled skin, especially in the "high strength" concentration we provide. And on open skin, stinging and redness is common. Removing the fragrance won't change that. You could remove it sooner, if stinging becomes a problem.

If you wonder why peptides sting - Peptides are also in the digestive juices of the stomach.. Only these peptides are a bit different :-) Same with Retinoic acid. Stings terribly on open skin. "No pain - no gain", as they say..

I also assume the fragrance is there to mask the smell of all those other ingredients. Without fragrance, the mask may smell weird.
I am not a medical doctor and my comments should not be considered medical advice.

The dermaneedling part of our site is http://owndoc.com/category/dermarolling/

emily100

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Copper peptides
« Reply #10 on: July 26, 2010, 08:50:45 PM »
Sarah, leaving the plastic-y mask on top of the cloth type mask is very awkward and hard to work with.  Would it hurt to leave it off??  There is so much of the peptide on the cloth mask so I don't really get the point of the plastic-y  mask. It wants to come off my face. I just keep kinda having to hold it on and then it starts dripping a lot......it's just a pain to use that one on top of the cloth one. What do you think?

SarahVaughter

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Copper peptides
« Reply #11 on: July 27, 2010, 07:27:43 AM »
The mask's plastic layer can be removed because it is originally intended for use on closed skin. On "open", dermarolled skin, occlusion won't be necessary for extra penetration.

There is a bit too much copper peptide liquid in the mask so it leaks a little. You do not have to use the mask at all - in principle you can wring it out and just use the liquid.

Perhaps the best method is to just discard the plastic part and let the mask drip out in its sachet, then use it.

Using a paperclip, close the sachet with the remaining liquid and keep it in the fridge. Use that liquid later on your skin, applying it with your fingers.

   If you want, there is enough liquid in the mask to serve you multiple times. You can cut off a piece of the mask with scissors and smear it all over your face.  Put the rest of the mask back. Close it with a paper clip, the next day or some days later cut another piece off the mask and smear it again on your face. In this way the mask will serve you several times. If there are liquids left in the sachet use them as well. The mask is a bit too watery - I agree but it has a high concentration of copper peptides.

 

Hope this helps :-)
I am not a medical doctor and my comments should not be considered medical advice.

The dermaneedling part of our site is http://owndoc.com/category/dermarolling/

emily100

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Copper peptides
« Reply #12 on: August 05, 2010, 01:30:21 AM »
Sarah, you are just awesome! I can't thank you enough for always answering my questions in such a detailed informative way!  Thank you for this information!!!! I appreciate your providing tips to us! You don't come across as someone trying to push their products down anyone's throat and even give us ways to help us economically / logistically, etc. THANK YOU!! This goes far in my book!  I want you to know that I am on a very active plastic surgery forum where I've been talking about your dermarolling website/forum.... and two of the gals there have purchased from you recently, I believe.  I talk about how great and knowledgeable you are and what high quality products you have.  I hope it sends you more business!  Thanks and have a good day!

kakalakingma

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Copper peptides
« Reply #13 on: January 03, 2011, 04:14:44 AM »
Hi Sarah,

      I ask them about that, too, via email and on the phone. I was so confused about "hydrolyzed soy protein and copper chloride" (or Skin Remodeling Copper Peptide aka SRCP, as they call it) when I found out about the website. At first I thought GHK-Cu is stronger, but they corrected me and said that SRCP is more stable and stronger and compatible with hydroxy acids. The receptionist does admit to me that the majority of the research available is on GHK-Cu, but reassured me that the benefits (e.g., wound healing & anti-inflammatory effect) found in GHK-Cu is also present in SRCP, but more stable.

This is what Dr. Loren Pickart said via email:

"1. Gly-His-Lys (GHK) is the FGCP. It is in human blood and has been extensively studied. GHK has a huge number of positive action but is very sensitive to enzyme breakdown.

The SGCPs are made from breakdown resistant copper peptides (peptide hydrolyzates) of various proteins and are stronger than GHK
."

NOTE: FGCP stand for first generation copper peptide

In another email with Cassia, a wonderful and insightful lady that works for the doc. She is the best, super duper helpful.

"I was able to speak with Dr. Pickart regarding your question on if second generation copper-peptides (which use hydrolyzed soy protein and copper chloride) breakdown or convert into GHK-Cu. He said no, they do not. They are two separate compounds. However 2nd generation products, which are stronger and more stable than GHK, act very similar to GHK-Cu in the effects that they are able to generate in the skin. They imitate what GHK does for the skin with a more potent effect."

Now, Cassia also sent me the link to the web page where the studies done on SCRP are provided. There is quite a load to read on that page. The doc expound on the studies for ya. But I have pasted the studies citation below (I think there is more else where).

I hope I help you. If you are still in need of answer you can call them or email the doc. Cassia says he love answering people's questions. Just don't ask him about concentration; I tried and he says it is confidential. If you have biochemical questions and studies and stuff, he is all for that I think. He is a biochemist after all. :D

kakalakingma

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Copper peptides
« Reply #14 on: January 03, 2011, 06:22:33 AM »
Hi Sarah, I doubt that it is just the "copper chloride" that is doing the job. It is the combination of "hydrolyzed soy proteins" and "copper chloride". I believe I asked Dr. Loren Pickart which proteins he is referring, but he didn't really answer my questions, he just said "proteins". I do believe there is a higher level of specificity in his formulation. I mean... how much hydrolyzed soy protein is used? How much copper chloride is used? Even concentration or odd? What kind of proteins? How many? What about the stereoisomeric forms of the protein? What is the appropriate pH of the formula? How much is too much?  I doubt copper chloride alone is doing the healing and anti-inflammatory and all the other benefits. I think it is the chemical reaction between the specific form of soy protein and copper that yield a specific form or forms of copper peptide. I have to ask them.

Also, talk of cost is one thing, and talk of formulation and its technicality is another. And like I said before I tried to ask for concentration, but he won't give it to me.

I am not sure about DIY on copper serums or cream. I mean, I know vitamin C DIY is widely known and plus there are so many positive review on this. I am not so sure about the copper peptide DIY. The other doc from smartskincare.com does not recommend DIY for copper peptide due to his speculation of the risk of free copper ions in the skin (assuming there is too much or high concentration). But remember he has no solid study to prove this, only anecdotal evidence on his forum. Dr. Loren Pickart did refute his claims.

I did remember talking about GHK-Cu over the phone and the receptionist did say their GHK-Cu serum and Cream cost more because it is the ingredient is more expensive.

Who is John by the way?