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Author Topic: Autologous (own) blood injection for acne scars or atrophic scars  (Read 14567 times)

SarahVaughter

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Autologous blood injection is a method of using the body's own cells to help repair scars. It is effective if repeatedly done.

   Blood is taken from the patient and immediately reinjected precisely into acne/atrophic scars. This procedure is repeated every month until improvement is achieved. Sometimes the blood is centrifuged and platelet-rich plasma is used (this method is more expensive). The resulting hematoma stimulates the extracellular matrix repair. A hematoma is a signal for the body that there is damage and it has to be fixed. Blood has valuable components such as growth factors, peripheral blood stem cells and other cells essential for cellular regulation and repair.

   The blood is injected into the scar and either it is left alone or the hematoma is used as a target for a vascular laser or IPL.  Lasers, in skin treatment work because some skin structures strongly absorb certain wavelengths of light. This light energy is converted to heat, which causes damage to the targeted cells without damaging the surrounding tissue.

Laser treatment for hair reduction targets Melanin in the hair follicle, vascular laser targets Oxyhemoglobin in red blood cells. Treating the hematoma with a vascular laser heats up the scar and further stimulates the remodeling of tissue.

   

Sometimes a subcision is performed prior to injecting the blood. Subcison is a method where a syringe is placed horizontally underneath the scar and moved in order to sever the fibrous bands that are holding the scar down. Subcision also provides a pocket for the injected blood so that more blood can be injected.

(Rolling and especially needling functions as a vertical subcision. It cuts the fibrous septae and severs the scar's deep attachments)

   

The advantage of this procedure is that it is easy to perfom, does not cost much in materials and the results should be long-lasting. Since the blood injected is the patient's own, there is no risk of an allergic reaction.

   

Other autologous fillers have been used for skin augmentation – own fat, own collagen, own fibroblasts etc. They are safe and effective but in comparison to blood injections they are much more expensive.

    Synthetic fillers, especially long lasting ones, carry a risk of granuloma formation.
My comments should not be considered medical advice.

The dermaneedling part of our site is http://owndoc.com/dermarolling/

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havingfaith

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Autologous (own) blood injection for acne scars or atrophic scars
« Reply #1 on: November 10, 2010, 03:15:21 AM »
Sarah,

Which is better to inject blood or plasma?

Thanks

SarahVaughter

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Autologous (own) blood injection for acne scars or atrophic scars
« Reply #2 on: November 10, 2010, 01:36:13 PM »
No preference. Several studies found no difference, meaning it's not the red blood cells responsible for the beneficial effects.

Autologous blood has been also used in Orthopedics to promote healing of tendons, muscles, joints etc.

   

 

This study claims that platelet rich plasma is not superior to "ordinary" blood:

   

    "Autologous blood injections for refractory lateral epicondylitis". Edwards SG, Calandruccio JH. (2003).

  “As yet, there has been no study to demonstrate that a PRP (Platelet-Rich Plasma) injection is superior to ABI (Autologous Blood Injection), with both techniques demonstrating improvement in 70-80% of patients.[3]  

  http://www.medlibrary.org/medwiki/Autologous_blood_injection

 

   

 

The same here:

    Platelet Rich Plasma Injection

  "A PRP injection is similar to an ABI (Autologous Blood Injection), with the only difference being that a larger amount of blood is withdrawn from an arm vein. The blood is then placed into a tube, which in turn is placed into a machine called a centrifuge, which spins many thousand times a minute. The blood is left to spin for 15 minutes. At this point, the cells in the blood have separated from the fluid component of blood (plasma) into the three main cell types: red blood cells, white blood cells and platelets. The platelets are then selectively removed and used for injection. In this way, the theoretical benefit is that a greater concentration of platelets is delivered into the damaged body part than if whole blood was given alone (approximately 8-10 times greater concentration). There is, however, no scientific research documenting this benefit at the time of writing."

  http://www.melbourneradiology.com.au/fact-sheets/autologous-blood-injection-platelet-rich-plasma-injection.html

 

   

In this study, "ordinary" blood was used for acne scars:

 

The use of autologous blood as a chromophore and tissue augmentation agent


  "After drawing blood from the patient, this was immediately reinjected into premarked areas of atrophic scars."

http://cat.inist.fr/?aModele=afficheN&cpsidt=14134738
My comments should not be considered medical advice.

The dermaneedling part of our site is http://owndoc.com/dermarolling/

Our digital dermaneedling device ($170 for home users and clinics): http://derminator.com/

Derminator videos: https://www.youtube.com/user/owndoc/videos?flow=grid

Success

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Autologous (own) blood injection for acne scars or atrophic scars
« Reply #3 on: January 22, 2011, 01:02:08 AM »
Hi, I'm new here and have already found some great information.  I’m 58 and am looking for ways to correct acne scars and signs of aging.  I'm wondering if anyone has used Selphyl (vampire face lift) along with dermarolling/needling.  It sounds simular to the autologous blood injections in this thread.  It is your own blood run through a centerfuge and reinjected into your skin.  According to their web site Selphyl causes remodeling in about 3 weeks and lasts up to 18 months.  It is reported to work very well for acne scars.

I’ve been looking into it and was wondering if dermarolling along with the masks and serums you offer would enhance or prolong Selphyl’s effect?  Any thoughts?

Thank you for a great site!

kakalakingma

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Autologous (own) blood injection for acne scars or atrophic scars
« Reply #4 on: January 22, 2011, 02:30:53 AM »
I cannot believe I missed this thread. This is technique/method for treating acne scars is so interesting and ... wild? blood!? Vampire?! LOL. I need to look into this more. Well, for anyone you like videos, I have posted a few I found on youtube:

[video=youtube;brQoLmvCvIU]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=brQoLmvCvIU[/video]

[video=youtube;gz0HkZpl7IA]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gz0HkZpl7IA&feature=related[/video]

[video=youtube;laIEWzF8AZQ]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=laIEWzF8AZQ&feature=related[/video]

For a host of Sephyl related videos.. here is the YOUTUBE HOME PAGE LINK.

This is interesting I need to research on this!!!

I guess the one drawback is that you have to go to a professional for this. Well, another is if you cannot tolerate getting your blood drawn.

Sarah, I think you should start selling centrifuge and needles to draw blood. LOLOOLOLOL. ... just kiddin... well...

[Update: Here is the official website LINK for more information. Here is the page for before and after.

SarahVaughter

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Autologous (own) blood injection for acne scars or atrophic scars
« Reply #5 on: January 29, 2011, 06:53:08 AM »
Success;1156 wrote:

  I've been looking into it and was wondering if dermarolling along with the masks and serums you offer would enhance or prolong Selphyl's effect? Any thoughts?

  Thank you for a great site!

   

     

  Sorry, I do not know whether dermarolling could prolong the effect of autologous blood injection but the effects of dermarolling are long lasting so the combination of those two can be useful.

   

  If you manage to reduce the depth of your wrinkles with dermarolling, it doesn't mean the wrinkle will never appear again or never become deep again. Dermarolling can't stop aging.

   

  Concerning acne scars or other scars, the results achieved by a dermaroller or a single needle appear to be permanent even though dermarolling and microneedling are relatively new methods and only time will show how long their effects will last.
My comments should not be considered medical advice.

The dermaneedling part of our site is http://owndoc.com/dermarolling/

Our digital dermaneedling device ($170 for home users and clinics): http://derminator.com/

Derminator videos: https://www.youtube.com/user/owndoc/videos?flow=grid

Success

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Autologous (own) blood injection for acne scars or atrophic scars
« Reply #6 on: January 29, 2011, 02:06:00 PM »
Thank you for your replies.  I'm looking into more natural ways that slow the aging process and repairs scars using the body's own healing abilities.  I like to do a lot of research before I decide to use a procedure and so far I've learned about Dermarolling, TCA CROSS and Selphyl.  These all seem to work by boosting the body's repair response.  There is a lot of research into Selphyl and this site is superior to all others for dermarolling.  Do you know of another similar site that truthfully addresses TCA CROSS or any other procedures that would be helpful?  Thanks so much for everyone’s input.  

I'll be ordering my Dermaroller kit and interviewing area plastic surgeons for Selphyl injections as soon as I get back from my trip.  I'll keep you posted on my progress.

Thanks for such a great site!

SarahVaughter

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Autologous (own) blood injection for acne scars or atrophic scars
« Reply #7 on: May 13, 2012, 05:59:49 AM »
Interesting article about applying Platelet Rich Plasma after dermarolling.

The original article is in Spanish but I translated it with Google Translate and fixed it up a little.

Acne?

Improve scars with PRP therapy



http://peru.com/2012/01/09/estilo-de-vida/salud/acne-conozca-terapia-cicatrices-prp-noticia-37302



Eliminate those ugly scars with this technique.

Severe acne scars can take up to 5 to 10 sessions, spaced 4 to 6 weeks.

This therapy to eliminate severe scarring caused by acne, is done by taking a small amount of blood from the patient to produce platelet rich plasma (PRP), then applied to freshly dermarolled acne scars.

The Dermaroller creates microscopic channels that allow PRP to penetrate deeply into the skin affected by acne scars and starts its healing. The PRP stimulates the proliferation of fibroblasts and keratinocytes, forming new skin.

In addition to correcting acne scars, the procedure also improves the texture and vitality of the skin by creating new blood vessels (angiogenesis). These provide essential nutrients to the skin, maintaining a healthy skin.

Dr. Kalieska Arroyo of the Clinic for Surgery Surgery and Estetic Medicine said the procedure is simple and convenient, with minor discomfort. Occasionally, anesthetic cream or ice packs are used to make the treatment less painful.

 

Usually, there is little or no downtime associated with this treatment. Some redness, and sometimes bruising in the treated area may last a few days after treatment. Makeup can be applied immediately after treatment.

Surgeon Gaby del Rio said acne scars look better within days after the first treatment and continue to improve for the next month. Severe acne scars can take up to 5 to 10 sessions, spaced 4 to 6 weeks. The procedure takes around 30 minutes.

                      Attached files
My comments should not be considered medical advice.

The dermaneedling part of our site is http://owndoc.com/dermarolling/

Our digital dermaneedling device ($170 for home users and clinics): http://derminator.com/

Derminator videos: https://www.youtube.com/user/owndoc/videos?flow=grid