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Author Topic: .25 vs .5 for epidermis  (Read 4920 times)

h2k

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.25 vs .5 for epidermis
« on: January 13, 2013, 06:19:08 PM »
If I am looking to improve skin tone, texture, and epidermis thickness, it seems the .25 and .50 are options.

I would like to use the .5 (maybe it would be better?), but I get a little pink for about 5 days. I am wondering if the .25 would be effective for this or are the needles just too short to help very much?

SarahVaughter

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Re: .25 vs .5 for epidermis
« Reply #1 on: January 16, 2013, 03:19:43 PM »
The skin consists of the epidermis and the dermis. The epidermis is very thin compared to the dermis.

Total skin thickness varies depending where it is on the body (the thinnest skin is on the eyelids, approx. 0.5 mm, the thickest is on the foot soles, approx. 4 mm) and it also varies individually but it is on average 1 - 2 mm thick in total.

The thickness of the epidermis also depends on where on the body it is. The epidermis on the eyelids is about 0.05 mm thick. The epidermis on the foot soles is about 1.5 mm thick. The face has on average about a 0.1 to 0.3 mm thick epidermis.

Thus a 0.25 mm dermaroller will affect and improve the tone, texture and thickness of the epidermis.

A 0.5 mm roller will even reach the top layer of the dermis.
My comments should not be considered medical advice.

The dermaneedling part of our site is http://owndoc.com/dermarolling/

Our digital dermaneedling device ($170 for home users and clinics): http://derminator.com/

Derminator videos: https://www.youtube.com/user/owndoc/videos?flow=grid

h2k

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Re: .25 vs .5 for epidermis
« Reply #2 on: January 20, 2013, 11:39:10 PM »
But does a .2 (or .25 mm) needle length actually penetrate to the same distance as the needle length? Is it possible that is does not penetrate the full depth when rolling. This could be to the skin resisting the pressure to puncture (i.e. it bends but not breaks).


SarahVaughter

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Re: .25 vs .5 for epidermis
« Reply #3 on: January 22, 2013, 01:56:29 PM »
A dermaroller does not penetrate the full length of the needles. A dermastamp more or less does.

A 0.2 mm dermaroller will however penetrate into the epidermis.
My comments should not be considered medical advice.

The dermaneedling part of our site is http://owndoc.com/dermarolling/

Our digital dermaneedling device ($170 for home users and clinics): http://derminator.com/

Derminator videos: https://www.youtube.com/user/owndoc/videos?flow=grid

h2k

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Re: .25 vs .5 for epidermis
« Reply #4 on: January 25, 2013, 12:12:44 PM »
Few questions:

- To thicken the epidermis and improve skin texture/tone, does the needle need to at least reach the dermis? Otherwise, wouldn't you just be poking dead skin? Would any "signals" to change actually occur?

- Since the dermaroller does not penetrate the full depth of the needle, then only about .1 to .15mm (approx) would be the depth of the penetration. This is still small compared to the epidermis thickness.

- Would a large dermastamp be better to control the depth then?

SarahVaughter

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Re: .25 vs .5 for epidermis
« Reply #5 on: January 27, 2013, 12:35:23 PM »
A 0.5 mm roller is the best option for your purpose.
My comments should not be considered medical advice.

The dermaneedling part of our site is http://owndoc.com/dermarolling/

Our digital dermaneedling device ($170 for home users and clinics): http://derminator.com/

Derminator videos: https://www.youtube.com/user/owndoc/videos?flow=grid